Selasa, 10 Mei 2011

Postmodernis m, De rrida and Différ ance : A C ritique


An  influent ial  new  movement   has   emerged  in  p hilos op hy  in  t he  p as t   t hirt y   years  which has  come t o b e known as  Pos t modernis m.  Some b elieve t hat  t he  t erm "Pos t modernis m" is  amb iguous  and hard t o define, and it  is  t rue t hat  it  is   oft en us ed in a numb er of ways  which b ear lit t le relat ion t o t he p os t modernis t   movement   in  p hilos op hy.    For  t he  p os t modernis t   ap p roach  t o  knowledge  is   als o  dominant   in  a  variet y  of  dis cip lines ,  es p ecially  lit erat ure,  his t ory,  t heology, feminis m, and mult icult uralis m (t hough I do not  wish to suggest that   everyt hing in thes e dis cip lines  is  defined b y p os t modernis m).  Before I b egin   my  dis cus s ion  and  crit iq ue  of  p os t modernis m,  I  wis h  t o  p res ent   my  own   unders t anding  of  t he  t erm,  a  working  definit ion  which  cap t ures   it s   p h i l o s o p h i ca l imp ort .  I define p os t modernis m as  a movement  whos e cent ral   t heme is  t he crit iq ue of ob ject ive rat ionalit y and ident it y, and a working out of  t he imp licat ions  of t his  crit iq ue for cent ral q ues t ions  in p hilos op hy, lit erat ure  and  cult ure.    My  definit ion  is   mot ivat ed  b y  my  b elief  t hat   p os t modernis m is   mainly a p hilos op hical t heory ab out  t he nat ure of knowledge, and the ability of  t he  human  mind  t o  know  realit y.    In  s hort ,  p os t modernis m  mainly  revolves   around  a  s et   of   met a p h ys i ca l   cl a i ms   ab out   t he  nat ures   of  language  and   meaning.    J ean­François   Lyot ard   des crib es   t he  p os t modern  condit ion  as   charact erized b y an "incredulit y t oward met anarrat ives ," and t his  is  as good a  definit ion  as   we  get  from wit hin the ranks  of post modernis m, as  long as it  is   unders t ood  t o  mean  an  incredulit y  t oward   a l l   met anarrat ives .  (O f  cours e  Lyot ard will officially deny t hat  p os t modernis m is  a met ap hys ical t hes is .)  In   t his   art icle,  I  will  at t emp t   t o  develop   a  s et   of  crit ical  reflect ions   on  t he   p h i l o s o p h i ca l  b a s i s of p os t modernis m, and p os t modernis t  t hinking generally. 
I  b elieve  t hat   a  careful  ex aminat ion  of  t he  p hilos op hical  b as is   of  p os t modernis m  is   t he  mos t   imp ort ant   q ues t ion  a  s erious   t hinker  can  rais e  ab out  p os t modernis m;  if t his  q ues t ion is  ignored, or t reat ed s up erficially, then   t he  ap p licat ion  of  p os t modernis t   ideas   t o  p hilos op hical  is s ues   and  t ex t s ,  t o   q ues t ions   and  is s ues   in  ot her  dis cip lines ,  and  t o  s ocial,  p olit ical  and   educat ional  agendas   will  b e  great ly  undermined.    (All  college cours es  which   are dealing wit h p os t modernis m s hould dis cus s  t his  q ues t ion.)  My article will   b e  an  at t emp t   t o  develop   a  s et   of  crit ical  reflect ions   on  t he  p hilos op hical   foundat ions   of  p os t modernis m  focus ing,  in  p art icular,  on  t he  work  of  t he  French p hilos op her, J acq ues  Derrida.  Derrida's  p hilos op hy is  oft en described   as   "decons t ruct ion,"  and  I cons ider  his   p hilos op hy an ideal rep res ent at ive of


p os t modernis t   p hilos op hy  in  general.    I  will,  t herefore,  us e  t he  t erms   "decons t ruct ion" and "p os t modernis m" s ynonymous ly for t he p urposes of this   art icle. 
I will illus t rat e t hat  Derrida's  claim t hat texts­­especially philosophical   t ex t s ­­need t o b e decons t ruct ed, according t o t he met hod he p roposes, is easily   s hown  t o  b e  fraught   wit h  s erious   difficult ies .    T hes e  difficult ies   will  b e  illus t rat ed  p art ly  b y  means   of  an  analys is   of  Derrida's   decons t ruct ionis t   reading  of  Plat o.    I  will  t hen  p res ent   and  develop   five  crit icis ms   of  p os t modernis m: firs t , t hat  it  confus es  aes t het ics with metaphysics; second, that   it   mis t akes   a s s er t i o n   for   a r g u men t   in  p hilos op hy;   t hird,  t hat   it   is   guilt y  of   r el a t i vi s m;   fourt h,  t hat   it   is   s el f ­co n t r a d i ct o r y ;   and,  fift h,  t hat   it   is   guilt y  of  int ellect ual arrogance b ecaus e it s  p rop onent s  s eem t o ins is t  t hat  it s  crit iq ue of  t radit ional  p hilos op hy  can  s t ill  s ucceed  even  t hough  it s  positive claims  have  not  been es t ab lis hed. 
I.  T HE POSIT IVE CLAIMS OF POSTMO DE R NISM 
2  T he main t hes is  of Derrida's  p os it ion, as  I unders t and it , can be stated   in t he following way.  Wes t ern p hilos op hers  have b een mis t aken in their belief  t hat   b eing  is   p r es en ce ,  and  t he  key  t o  unders t anding  p res ence  is   s omet hing   along  t he  lines   of  s ub s t ance,  s amenes s ,  ident it y,  es s ence,  clear  and  dis t inct   ideas , et c.  For, according t o Derrida, a l l  i d en t i t i es , p r es en ces , p r ed i ca t i o n s ,  et c., d ep en d  f o r  t h ei r  exi s t en ce o n  s o met h i n g  o u t s i d e t h ems el ves , something   wh i ch  i s  a b s en t  a n d  d i f f er en t  f r o m t h ems el ves .  O r again: all identities involve  t heir d i f f er en ces and r el a t i o n s ;  t hes e differences  and relat ions  are as p ect s  or  feat ures  out s ide of the ob ject ­­different  from it , yet  relat ed t o it ­­yet  t hey a r e  n ever   f u l l y  p r es en t .    O r  again:  realit y  it s elf  is   a  kind  of  "free  p lay"  of   d i f f ér a n ce   (a  new  t erm  coined  b y  Derrida);   no  ident it ies   really  ex is t   (in  t he  t radit ional s ens e) at  t his  level;  ident it ies  are s imp ly cons t ructs of the mind, and   es s ent ially of language. 
3  In order t o elab orat e t hes e p oint s  furt her, it  is  help ful t o distinguish in   Derrida's  work b et ween t wo realms , t he realm of realit y (or of différance), and   t he realm of ident it ies  (or of p redicat ion and p res ence).  Derrida b elieves  t hat   t here are no ident it ies , no s elf­cont ained p res ences , no fix ed, s et t led meanings   at  the level of d i f f ér a n ce .  Furt her, t he realm of d i f f ér a n ce is n o n ­co g n i t i ve ;   i.e., it  cannot  b e fully cap t ured or des crib ed b y means  of any set of concepts, or  logical s ys t em which makes  ob ject s  "p res ent " t o t he mind.  Derrida makes this   p oint   well  in   Ma r g i n s   o f   Ph i l o s o p h y :  "It   is   t he  dominat ion  of  b eings   t hat   d i f f ér a n ce everywhere comes  t o s olicit  . . . t o s hake . . . it  is  t he det erminat ion   of  b eing  as   p res ence  t hat   is   int errogat ed  b y  t he  t hought   of   d i f f ér a n ce .  Di f f ér a n ce   is   not .    It   is   not   a  p res ent   b eing.    It   governs   not hing,  reigns   over  not hing,  and  nowhere  ex ercis es   any  aut horit y  .  .  .  T here  is   no  es s ence  of   d i f f ér a n ce ." 
Yet ,  according  t o  Derrida,  alt hough  t he  realm  of   d i f f ér a n ce   is   non­


4  cognit ive, it  never occurs wi t h o u t cognit ive knowledge (the realm of presence).  T his  is  b ecaus e our cont act  wit h it  in human ex p erience, our involvement with   it  t hrough language, always  t akes  p lace b y means  of concep t s , or p redication. 
And t his  is  s imp ly t o s ay t hat  all knowledge is co n t ext u a l in t he s ense that the  relat ions   of  an  ob ject   in  any  s ys t em  of  ob ject s   or  meanings   are  always   changing  (differing),  and  hence  meaning  (i.e.,  ident it y)  is   cont inually  b eing   p os t p oned (i.e., deferred).  T he realm of d i f f ér a n ce is  ap p rop riat ely conveyed   or  ex p res s ed  in  p hilos op hical  works   b y  means   of  met ap hor  b ecaus e  it   is   t he  nat ure  of  met ap hor  t o  s ignify  wit hout   s ignifying,  and  t his   illus t rat es   nicely   Derrida's  point  that an ident it y is  what  it  is  not  and is  not  what  it  is .  Derrida  s killfully  emp loys   many  different   and  oft en  s t riking  met ap hors   t o  make  t his   s ame point  rep eat edly: margins , t race, flow, archi­writ ing, t ain of t he mirror,  alt erit y, s up p lement , et c.  We mus t  now cons ider what  all of t his  means for the  t as k  of  evaluat ing  p art icular  worldviews ,  and  for  t he  p ract ice  of  t ex t ual   analys is . 
T o  relat e  all  of  t his   t o  t he  is s ue  of  worldviews   (es p ecially  t he  worldview  of  t radit ional  p hilos op hy),  and  t o  ex p res s   t hes e  p oint s   in  more  down  t o  eart h  language,  what   t he  p os t modernis t s   are  s aying  is   t hat   no   p art icular worldview can claim t o have t he t rut h.  All worldviews can be called   int o  q ues t ion  (including  t he  worldview  of  decons t ruct ion  it s elf,  a  p oint   t o   which  I  will  ret urn  lat er).    T he  reas on  all  worldviews   can  b e  called  int o   q ues t ion is b ecaus e t he meanings  which are cons t it ut ive of a worldview cannot   b e  known  t o  b e  t rue  ob ject ively.    T his   is   b ecaus e  t here  is   no  ob ject ive  knowledge.    All  knowledge  is   co n t ext u a l   and  is   influenced  b y  cult ure,  t radit ion,  language,  p rejudices ,  b ackground  b eliefs ,  et c.,  and  is   t herefore,  in   s ome  very  imp ort ant   s ens e,  r el a t i ve   t o  t hes e  p henomena.    T he  influence  of  t hes e p henomena on t rut h or meaning is  not  t rivial or b enign;  it  is  s uch t hat  it   inevit ab ly  undermines   all  claims   t o  ob ject ivit y  t hat   one  might   b e  t emp t ed  t o   make from t he p oint  of view of one's  worldview.  So t he job  of decons t ruct ion   is   t o  challenge  and  call  int o  q ues t ion  all  claims   t o  ob ject ive  knowledge  b y   illus t rat ing  alt ernat ive  meanings   and  "t rut hs "  in  any  p art icular  worldview,  which are really t here whet her t he adherent s  of t he worldview recognize t hem  or  not .    And  t hes e  alt ernat ive  meanings   will  undermine  t he  worldview  in   q ues t ion,  b ecaus e  t hey  will  b e  different   from,  and  oft en  op p os ed  t o,  t he  original, "ob ject ive" meanings  claimed for that worldview. 
Decons t ruct ion, t herefore, q uickly lends  it s elf t o a p olit ical agenda in   t he  s ens e  t hat   worldviews   are  almos t   b y  definit ion  op p res s ive  s ince  t hey   p rivilege s ome (lit eral) meanings  and marginalize ot hers ;  decons t ruct ion t hus   b ecomes  the met hod for reject ing and deb unking worldviews .  Convers ely, it   als o  allows   t hos e  views   and  readings   and  alt ernat ive  meanings   which  have  us ually b elonged t o minorit y group s , and which have oft en b een marginalized,  t o reclaim t heir right ful p lace in t he market p lace of ideas .  Not e, however, that   t hey  do  not   reclaim  t heir  p lace  b ecaus e  t hey  are  t rue  (for  t hat   would  b e  t o   acknowledge  ob ject ive  knowledge),  b ut   b ecaus e,  s ince  t here  is   no  ob ject ive
3  


knowledge, t hey have jus t  as  much claim t o legit imacy as  any ot her view.  O f  cours e, t hey t oo will have t o b e decons t ruct ed in t he end.  (This is a point many   s up p ort ers   of  t he  decons t ruct ionis t   ap p roach  convenient ly  overlook;   t hey   freq uent ly t alk as  if t he marginal views  are s omehow t r u e , and the mainstream  views  somehow f a l s e .) 
5  In t he language of t ex t ual analys is , Derrida is  p rop os ing that there are  no f i xed  mea n i n g s p res ent  in t he t ex t , des p it e any ap p earance t o t he cont rary.  Rat her,  t he  ap p arent   ident it ies   (i.e.,  lit eral  meanings )  p res ent   in  a  t ex t   als o   dep end for t heir ex is t ence on s omet hing out s ide t hems elves , s omet hing which   is  abs ent  and different  from t hems elves  (i.e., t hey dep end on t he op erat ion of   d i f f ér a n ce ).  As  a res ult , t he meanings  in a t ex t  cons t ant ly shift both in relation   t o t he s ub ject  who works  wit h t he t ex t , and in relat ion t o t he cultural and social   world in which t he t ex t  is  immers ed.  In t his  way, t he lit eral readings  of t ex t s ,  along  wit h  t he  int ent ions   of  t he  aut hor,  are  called  int o  q ues t ion  b y  Derrida's   view  of  ident it y.    His   p os it ion  p rivileges   writ ing   as   op p os ed  t o  s p eech  and   t hought , for writ ing has  a cert ain indep endence from aut hor and reader which   gives  a p riorit y t o amb iguit y, non­lit eralit y, and which frus t rates the intentions   of  t he  aut hor.    As   t he  French  writ er,  Roland  Bart hes ,  s ugges t s ,  our  concern   mus t  be to look at h o w t ex t s  mean, not  at wh a t t hey mean. 6  Derrida's  t hes is ,  however, is  not  res t rict ed to b ooks  or art works , for tex t s  may cons is t  of any   s et   of  ever­changing  meanings .    Hence,  t he  world,  and  almos t   any  ob ject   or  comb inat ion  of  ob ject s   in  it ,  may  b e  regarded  as   a  "t ex t ."    Pos t modernis t   p hilos op hy  is   t herefore  very  radical  indeed.    Walt   Anders on  p ut s   t his   very   ap t ly when he s ays  t hat  "Decons t ruct ion goes  well b eyond [s aying] right ­you­  are­if­you­t hink­you­are;  it s  mes s age is  clos er t o wrong you are what ever you   t hink, unles s  you t hink you may b e wrong, in which cas e you may be right­­but   you don't  really mean what  you think you do anyway." 
7  Now b efore we p roceed t o elab orat e furt her jus t  what  Derrida's  view   of  ident it y  ent ails ,  it   is   wort h  not ing  t hat   p os t modernis t   t hinkers ­­in  whos e  numb er  I  would  include  Roland  Bart hes   and  Michel  Foucault ,  in  addit ion to   Lyot ard and Derrida­­have somet imes  tried to avoid the change that t hey are  offering  a  p hilos op hical t h eo r y ab out  language and realit y, and have tried to   ins is t  t hat  t hey are s imp ly p rop os ing a new met h o d for reading t ex t s .  In short,  t hey would deny t hat  t hey are making s ub s t ant ive or met ap hys ical claims .  In   fact , s ome p hilos op hers  b elieve t hat  Derrida s hould not  b e read as making any   s ub s t ant ive claims  at all.  This  is  a view advocat ed by Richard Rort y. 
8  Rort y ident ifies  t wo different  ways  in which Derrida has  b een read by   his   American  admirers .    O n  one  s ide  are  t hos e  who  read  him  as   a  "t rans cendent al"  p hilos op her,  i.e.,  as   a  p hilos op her  who  gives   us   "rigorous   argument s   for  s urp ris ing  p hilos op hical  conclus ions ." A  t rans cendent al   p hilos op her,  t herefore,  is   a  p hilos op her  who  is   making  s ub s t ant ive  claims   which are eit her t rue or fals e, and for which he offers  argument s  (and which, if  t rue, could p os s ib ly mot ivat e s ocial and p olit ical agendas ).  T his  is  ob vious ly   t he way in which I am reading Derrida.  O n t he ot her s ide, according t o Rort y,


9  are  t hos e  who  s ee  him  as   "having  invent ed  a  new,  s p lendidly  ironic  way  of  writ ing  ab out   t he  p hilos op hical  t radit ion"  which  "emp has izes   t he  p layful,  dis t ancing,  ob liq ue  way  in  which  Derrida  handles   t radit ional  p hilos op hical   figures   and  t op ics ," and  which  is   not   concerned  wit h  t he  s ub s t ance  of  his   views .    T hat   is   t o  s ay,  Derrida  can  eit her  b e  read   in  t he  firs t   way  as   a  p hilos op her who is  making s ub s t ant ive claims  ab out language and reality, or in   t he  s econd  way  as   a  kind  of  dilet t ant e  who  ex p eriment s   wit h  t ex t s .    Rort y   p refers   t o  read  Derrida  in  t he  s econd  way.    As   a  p hilos op her, however, I see  lit t le value in reading Derrida in t he s econd way.  Surely t he mos t  res p ons ib le  op t ion  is   t o  read  him  in  t he  firs t   way,  es p ecially  s ince  t his   is   how  he is  mos t   oft en read?  Indeed, t his  is  the way in which he mu s t b e read if his  work is  t o   p rovide p hilos op hical s up p ort  for s ocial and p olit ical conclus ions .  In s hort , I  b elieve  t hat   Derrida  has   t o  b e taken at his  word and read as a tra ns cendent al   p hilos op her.  But  it  is  imp ort ant  t o not e t hat  if a t hinker in any dis cip line op t s   t o  read  Derrida  in  t he  s econd  way,  t hen  he  or  s he  cannot   us e  his   ideas   t o   advocat e educat ional, p olit ical or s ocial agendas ;  if however, one does wish to   emp loy his  ideas  in s up p ort  of various  agendas , t hen one is  ob liged t o p rovide  a  p hilos op hical  jus t ificat ion  for  t hes e  ideas .    For  ex amp le,  if  an  Englis h   p rofes s or wis hes  t o decons t ruct  t he t ex t s  of J ane Aus t en and read into them an   analys is   of  t he  op p res s ion  of  women  in  t he  ninet eent h  cent ury,  t hen  t hat   p rofes s or would have t o b eg i n t his  t as k wit h a p h i l o s o p h i ca l  j u s t i f i ca t i o n of  decons t ruct ion.    Let   me  move on to elab orat e and illus t rat e the point s  I have  b een making by turning to Derrida's  reading of Plat o. 
II.  DE R R IDA'S RE ADING OF PLAT O 
10  Now reading Derrida as  a t rans cendent al p hilosopher, he holds that all   of t he leading figures  of Wes t ern "logocent ricis m" have b een s educed by the  not ion  of  b eing  as   p res ence.    However,  t hes e  p hilos op hers   fail  t o  ap p reciat e  t he realit y of d i f f ér a n ce which is  really t here, and wh i ch  i s  o p er a t i ve i n  t h ei r   wo r k  wh et h er   t h ey  a ckn o wl ed g e  i t   o r   n o t .    What   we  mus t   now  do,  Derrida  b elieves ,  is   at t emp t   t o  s how  how  t heir  t ex t s ,  which  at t emp t   t o  ex p lain  t he  nat ure of realit y in t erms  of b eing as  p res ence, act ually cont inually presuppose  ab s ence,  d i f f ér a n ce ,  relat ions ,  et c.,  at   every  t urn.    T hat   is ,  we  mus t   "decons t ruct " their tex t s . 
I  want   now  t o  illus t rat e how this  is  supp os ed to work in a p art icular  cas e;   I  wis h  t o  cons ider  what   a  decons t ruct ionis t   reading  of  a  t ex t   act ually   looks   like.    Here  I  will  t urn  t o  an  ex aminat ion  of  one  of  Derrida's   own   readings :  t he  es s ay  on  Plat o  in  his   b ook   Di s s emi n a t i o n   called  "Plat o's   Pharmacy."    Now  Plat o  is   p erhap s   t he  "logocent ric"  p hilos op her   p a r   excel l en ce of the Wes t ern tradit ion;  he carries  a s p ecial guilt  becaus e he had   s uch  a  p rofound  influence  on  t he  his t ory  of  p hilos op hy.    Plat o,  of  cours e,  it   goes   almos t   wit hout   s aying,  was   at t emp t ing  t o  p res ent   in  his   work  a  s et   of  met ap hys ical views  ab out  t he nat ure of realit y.  His  main t hemes  are very well


known, and I will not  b ot her t o rep eat  t hem here.  But  Plat o is firmly within the  met ap hys ics   of  p res ence,  and  argues   at   lengt h  for  a  whole  met ap hys ics   of  ex t ra­linguis t ic  t rut hs   of  t he  t yp e  t hat ,  officially,  Derrida  wis hes   t o   decons t ruct . 
In  his   es s ay,  Derrida  focus es   in  p art icular  on  Plat o's   dialogue,  Ph a ed r u s ,  b ecaus e  at   t he  end  of  t he   Ph a ed r u s   Plat o  ex p licit ly  crit icizes   writ ing, and argues  that it  is  inferior t o p ure t hought  and dis cus s ion, and t hat   reading  and  rhet oric  are  inferior  t o  reas oning  and  dialect ic.    T he   Ph a ed r u s   ap p ears  to b e a q uit e app rop riat e t ex t  for Derrida t o choos e, b ecaus e, as  well   as  dealing wit h s ome of Plat o's  main ideas , it  als o cont ains an explicit criticism  of  writ ing,  and  argues   for  it s   inferiorit y  t o  s p eech  and  t hought .    So  t his   t ex t   might   b e  q uit e  fert ile  ground  for  Derrida.    Yet ,  as   one  ex amines   carefully   Derrida's  clos e reading of, and comment ary on, Plat o's  t ex t , his  ap p roach has   t hree feat ures  which it  is  imp ort ant  t o ident ify.  Firs t , a s ignificant  numb er of  s t at ement s  in Derrida's  1 0 0 + p age es s ay s imp ly make t he p oint that Plato does   p rivilege lit eral readings  (which Derrida ident ifies with speech) over non­literal   readings   (which  Derrida  ident ifies   wit h  writ ing).    In  doing  t his ,  Derrida's   reading  is   q uit e  mis leading,  in  t hat   he  makes   s o  ob vious   a  p oint   in  s uch  a  lab orious   and  ceremonial  way.  T hus ,  much  of  t he  es s ay  is   given  over  t o   es t ab lis hing  what   no­one  wis hes   t o  deny,  i.e.,  t hat   Plat o  is   wit hin  t he  met ap hys ics  of pres ence. 
Second, Derrida cont inually makes  t he p oint that Plato (and indeed his   t rans lat ors   and  comment at ors )  ignores   t he  fact   t hat   d i f f ér a n ce   is   t he  way   t hings   really  are,  which  means   t hat   t here  are  always   amb iguit ies   in  his   t ex t s   which Plat o pas s es  over in favor of what  we will call "t he lit eral meaning" of  language and t hought .  However, t his  is  a p oint  which Derrida s imp ly a s s er t s   over and over again;  nowhere does  he p rovide any reas ons or arguments aimed   at   convincing  us   t hat   we  s hould  accep t   t his   view.    (I  will illus t rat e this  point   lat er in t he art icle.)  T hird, int erwoven t hroughout  t he rep eat ed making of t his   claim are concret e s ugges t ions  and illus t rat ions  b y Derrida of how Plat o's text   mi g h t b e read in ways  ot her t han t he lit eral one.  Now let  me b riefly t urn to the  t wo main ex amp les  Derrida emp loys  t o decons t ruct  Plat o's  t ex t , ex amp les  he  us es  to illus t rat e the op erat ion of d i f f ér a n ce in Plat o's  tex t .  Thes e ex amp les   will allow me to illus t rat e furt her thes e three point s . 
O ne of t he words  Derrida s p ends  a lot  of t ime wit h is  t he G reek word   p h a r ma ko n which can mean eit her "cure" or "p ois on."  Derrida p oints out that   s ince  t his   word  is   init ially  amb iguous ,  it   b ecomes   neces s ary  t o  s p ecify  a  p art icular meaning, or ident it y, for it  b as ed on t he cont ex t  in which we find it .  For ex amp le, in t he Ph a ed r u s t he s t ory is  t old of how t he god T heut h t ried t o   s ell  his   wares   t o  King  T hamus   of  Egyp t .    Now  one  of  T heut h's   wares   is   writ ing, which he p romot es  as  a cure agains t  memory los s , and as  a significant   aid  in  t he  q ues t   for  knowledge.    T he  king,  however,  is   not   imp res s ed,  and   crit icizes  writ ing.  He is  ex p res s ing Plat o's  view when he s ays  t hat  writing will   have  a  det riment al  effect   on  memory,  and  will  cut   s t udent s   off  from  t heir


11  t eachers , and s o from t rut h.  Derrida's  p oint  ap p ears  t o be that both Theuth and   t he  King  s ee  writ ing  as   a   p h a r ma ko n ,  b ut   T heut h  means   b y  t his   t hat   it   is   a  cure, whereas  t he king (and Plat o) regards  it  as  a p ois on.  Derrida as s ert s  t hat   unt il Plat o imp os es  an int erp ret at ion here, t he meaning is  amb iguous.  Derrida  want s   us   t o  agree  t hat ,  in  realit y,  if  we  might   p ut   it   like  t hat ,  amb iguit y  is   p rimary, and ident it y is  s econdary, imp os ed, op p res s ive, and is exclusionary of  ot her p os s ib ilit ies .  T he amb iguit y, according t o Derrida, always  as s ert s  it s elf  when a new reader engages  wit h the tex t ;  and, in Plat o's  cas e, it  as s ert s  it s elf  when  a  t rans lat or  is   confront ed  b y  words   like p h a r ma ko n .    So,  according to   Derrida, Plat o "decides  in favor of a logic t hat  does  not  t olerat e s uch p as s ages   b et ween op p os ing s ens es  of t he s ame word. . . ." Plat o, in s hort , could have  emb raced  t he  free  p lay  of  meanings   and  op p os it ions   p res ent   in  his  tex t  (i.e.,  d i f f ér a n ce );   ins t ead,  he  t ried  t o  s up p res s   t hes e  op p os it ions ,  alt ernat ive  int erp ret at ions ,  amb iguit ies ,  p uns ,  met ap hors ,  et c.,  in  favor  of  a  "lit eral"  meaning.  T his  was  his  mis t ake, and t his  is  why he needs  t o b e decons t ruct ed. 
Let   me  t ake  a  s econd  ex amp le  from  t his   es s ay.    Here  we  t urn  t o  t he  word p h a r ma ko s , which refers  t o a "s cap egoat " in G reek religion.  T his  is  an   ex cellent  ex amp le wit h which t o illus t rat e Derrida's  met hod of deconstruction,  and it  will als o allow us  lat er on t o ident ify a p rob lem wit h t he ap p licat ion of  t he met hod.  Alt hough t he word p h a r ma ko s does  not  act ually appear in Plato's   t ex t , Derrida b elieves  t hat  t his  not ion of t he s cap egoat  is s u g g es ted by the text   b ecaus e of it s  clos e as s ociat ion wit h t he word p h a r ma ko n , and b ecaus e t here  are  a  numb er  of  p os s ib le  meanings   linked  t o  t he  concep t   of  s cap egoat   in   Plat o's  tex t . 
12  Derrida reveals  s ome of t hes e ot her p os s ib le meanings ;  for ex amp le,  t he s cap egoat  s ugges t s  b eing ins ide t he cit y, and b eing outside too, because the  G reeks  us ed t o s acrifice t he s cap egoat  and ex p el it  from t he cit y in a p urifying   ceremony.    It   could  b e  s een  as   b ot h  a  remedy  for  t he  cit y's  well­b eing, and a  kind  of  p ois on  t oo  which  had  t o  b e  ex p elled.    T he  not ion of p h a r ma ko s , t he  s cap egoat ,  is   als o  clos ely  connect ed  wit h  Socrat es ,  as   Yoav  Rinon  has   ins ight fully  p oint ed  out . Firs t ,  Socrat es   was   b orn  on  t he  day  of  t he  s cap egoat 's  ex p uls ion;  s econd, he hims elf was  a kind of s capegoat, essential to   t he  cit y,  yet  ex ecut ed.  He was  both cit izen and out s ider;  his  pers onalit y was   als o a realizat ion of t he unit y of cont radict ions : he was  honored and des p is ed,  loved  and  hat ed,  clos e  and  at   a  dis t ance,  knowing  all  and  knowing  not hing,  alive and dead, a remedy and a p ois on. 
13  Again, Derrida's  p oint  is  t hat  all of t hes e links  are possible readings of  Plat o's  t ex t , readings  which Plat o did not  int end, b ut  which are really there; "all   t hes e s ignificat ions  ap p ear nonet heles s ," 14  as  Derrida p ut s  it .  It  is  int eres t ing   t o  not e  t hat   while  Derrida  want s   t o  conclude  from  t his   decons t ruct ion  t hat   t here  does   not   ex is t   "a  Plat onic  t ex t ,  clos ed  up on  it s elf,  comp let e  wit h  it s   ins ide and out s ide" ;  nevert heles s  he want s  t o s ugges t  t hat  all t hes e p os s ib le  readings  are s u g g es t ed  b y t h e t ext  i t s el f , and b ecaus e of this they are somehow   l eg i t i ma t e readings .  By claiming t hat  t hes e meanings  are l inked to Plato's text


in  a  way  which  can  b e  illus t rat ed  in  t he  p roces s   of  decons t ruct ion,  Derrida  wis hes  to p lace a l i mi t on how far one can go wit h a decons t ruct ion of a t ex t .  In p art icular, he want s  t o avoid s aying t hat  one can jus t  make up meanings that   have no connect ion wit h t he t ex t  at  all.  Pres umab ly, readings , int erp ret ations,  and meanings n o t  su g g es t ed  by t h e text  it s el f would be unaccep t ab le. 
III.  FIVE CR IT IC AL PR OB LE MS FAC ING DE C ON ST R UC T ION  
1 ) Deco n s t r u ct i o n  con f u s es  aes t h et i cs  wi t h  met a p h ys i cs :  T he firs t   crit ical  p oint   t o  not e  is   t hat   a  decons t ruct ionis t   reading  is   not ,  at   leas t   as   Derrida p ract ices  it , a reading where a n y t yp e of reading is  p ermissible.  Yet, it   does   involve  "s haking  t ex t s "  t o  make  t hem  s hudder  and  reveal  alt ernat ive  meanings  t o t he lit eral meaning, and it  is  eas y t o s ee how t his  ap p roach might   s anct ion a n y t yp e of reading.  For it  is  very difficult  t o s ee how one could place  a cont rol on t he met hod of decons t ruct ion t o rule out  any s ugges t ed "link" to a  t ex t .  What  is  t o p revent  a reader from p roducing any meaning t hey wis h from  a  t ex t ?    What   is   t o  p revent   a  reader,  for  ex amp le,  from  concluding  t hat   t he  word p h a r ma ko s   (t he  s cap egoat )  s ugges t s   t hat   Plat o hims elf is  a s cap egoat ,  s ay  Aris t ot le's   s cap egoat ?    T he  difficult y  lies   in  t he  fact   t hat   it   will  b e  p rob lemat ic for Derrida to dict at e t hat  a p art icular meaning is  not  legit imat e,  for how can he judge t he ex p eriences , b ackground b eliefs , and int eres t s  of t he  reader  who  p roduces   t he  reading?    I  will  ret urn  t o  t his   p oint   in  a  moment .  Second, Derrida wis hes  t o ident ify alt ernat ive readings  in "Plat o's  Pharmacy"  in order t o illus t rat e t hat  ot her readings a r e p o s s i b l e .  Yet  it  s eems  t o me t hat   one can grant t his  p oint , and s t ill hold t hat  it f a i l s t o es t ab lis h Derrida's  main   claim.  His  main claim, as  we have s een, is  t hat  t he lit eral meaning of a t ex t  is   not  the legit imat e one. 
It  s eems  t hat  b y s imp ly s h o wi n g how a t ex t co u l d b e read in different   ways  t o t he way t he aut hor int ended, one does  not  demons t rat e t hat  t he lit eral   meaning is n o t t he main meaning, nor, more generally, t hat  meaning mus t  b e   f o r ever  def er r ed , or that all t ex t s  need t o b e decons t ruct ed.  In s hort , t he fact   t hat  we can force alt ernat ive meanings  out  of t ex t s  like Plat o's Ph a ed r u s may   have   a es t h et i c   s ignificance  (and  it   may  not ),  b ut   it   does   not   s eem  t o  follow   from  t his   t hat   it   als o  has   met a p h ys i ca l   s ignificance.    Derrida  is   s imp ly   confus ing  a  p os s ib le  (and  undoub t edly  cont rovers ial)  ap p roach  t o  t he  aes t het ics  of a t ex t  (or s et  of meanings ) wit h t he met ap hys ical imp licat ions  of  t he tex t . 
T o p ut  t his  key p oint  in a s light ly different  way:  Derrida appears to be  guilt y of making t he logically fallacious  move from t he p remis e that the reader   ca n   (aft er  much  invent ivenes s   and  p ains t aking  analys is )  read  t ex t s   in  ways   ot her t han t he lit eral one, t o t he conclus ion t hat  t his  is  how t he reader o u g ht to   read  t ex t s ,  or,  more  generally,  t o  t he  conclus ion  t hat   t here  are  no  lit eral   meanings , or t hat  t here is  no t rut h p res ent  in a t ex t .  T he firs t  p oint ma y b e of  aes t het ic s ignificance, as  I have s aid, b ut  no met a p h ys i ca l  co n cl u s i ons follow


from  it .    However,  it   is   met ap hys ical  conclus ions   which  Derrida  and  his   dis cip les  are supp os ed to b e es t ab lis hing. 
2 )   Deco n s t r u ct i o n   co n f u s es   a s s er t i o n   wi t h   a r g u men t :    T his   is   a  p art icularly egregious  mis t ake freq uent ly (and oft en arrogant ly) made b y t he  p rop onent s   of  decons t ruct ion.    Derrida  is   making,  as   we  have  s een,  a   met a p h ys i ca l claim about  the nat ure of language and meaning: t hat  t here are  no  t rans ­his t orical  meanings   or  es s ences ,  and  t hat   all  t ex t s   can  b e  decons t ruct ed.    However,  any  clos e  reading  of  any  of Derrida's  major works   reveals , I believe, t hat  he does  not  att emp t  to a r g u e fo r t his  claim;  rather, he  s imp ly a s s er t s it  over and over again. 
15  For  ex amp le,  in  t he  es s ay  on  Plat o  which  we  dis cus s ed  ab ove,  he is   s up p os ed  t o  b e  illus t rat ing  t hat   his   claims   ab out   ident it y  and d i f f ér a n ce   are  correct .    According  t o  Derrida,  Socrat es   s eeks   s elf­knowledge,  b ut   he  t hen   adds  t hat  s uch knowledge is  not  t rans p arent , t hat  it  mus t  b e "int erp ret ed, read,  decip hered." However, t his  is  an as s ert ion, not  an argument .  It does nothing   t o  convince  t he  reader  who  b elieves   s elf­knowledge  is   t rans p arent   and  t hat   Socrat es 's   meaning   is   p erfect ly  clear  and  t hat ,  alt hough  alt ernat ive  readings   might  b e p os s ib le, t hey are not  legit imat e.  O n p ages  7 0 ­7 1 , when dis cus s ing   Socrat es 's  s t ory of how t he maiden was  p laying with Pharmacia, but was swept   t o  her  deat h  b y  t he  wind,  Derrida  p oint s   out   t hat   t he  word   Ph a r ma ci a   als o   s ignifies   t he  adminis t rat ion  of  t he   p h a r ma ko n ,  t he  drug  (which  lit erally  can   mean  eit her  cure  or  p ois on).    He  t hen  claims   t hat   "t his   p h a r ma ko n ,  t his   `medicine' . . . already int roduces  it s elf int o t he b ody of t he dis cours e wit h all   it s   amb ivalence"  (p .70 ).    Derrida  t hen  goes   on  t o  rep eat edly  call the tex t  the  p h a r ma ko n .  Again,  no  argument   is   offered  for  t his .    He  might   claim  in  his   defens e  (alt hough  he  does   not )  t hat   h e   s imp ly  choos es   t o  emp has ize  t he  amb iguit y of t he word here, b ut  t he p rob lem wit h t his  move is  t hat  it  does  not   p revent me from choos ing to avoid amb iguit y in favor of lit eralit y, and, even   more imp ort ant , it  does  not hing t o convince us  t hat  we o u g h t t o p rivilege t he  amb iguous  reading. 
16  Again (on p age 8 5 ), following up  on his  p revious  as s ert ions , Derrida  s ays   t hat   Plat o  is   cons t rained  b y  t he  logic  of  ident it y­­b y  t he  s t andard   op p os it ions  of logic and realit y ("s p eech/ writ ing, life/ death, . . .  inside/outside,  . . . s erious nes s / p lay," et c.).  He t hen p roceeds  t o make a more ab s t ract  claim:   "His t ory­­has   b een  p roduced  in  it s   ent iret y  in  t he   p h i l o s o p h i ca l   difference  b et ween   myt h o s   and   l o g o s "   (p .86 ).    He  claims   on  p .96   t hat   t he  word   p h a r ma ko n   is   caught   in  a  "chain  of  s ignificat ions ,"  and  t hat   t hes e  s ignificat ions  go on working in s p it e of Plat o's  int ent ions .  As he puts it, "Plato   can n o t s ee t he links , can leave t hem in t he s hadow or b reak t hem up .  And yet   t hes e links  go on working of t hems elves .  In s p it e of him?  t hanks  t o him?  in   h i s   t ex t ?   o u t s i d e   t he  t ex t ?    b ut   t hen  where?    b et ween  his   t ex t   and  t he  language?    for  what   reader?    at   what   moment ?"  (p .96 ).    O f  cours e,  t hes e  s ignificat ions   only  go  on  working  b ecaus e  Derrida  is   f o r ci n g   alt ernat ive  meanings   out   of  t he  t ex t .    He  s ays   t hat   one  can  s up p res s  t hes e  alt ernat ive


meanings  if one wis hes , yet  t hey are s t ill p res ent  in t he t ex t .  His  p oint  is  t hat   t his  amb iguit y p recedes  Plat o's  decis ion in favor of lit erality­­"Plato decides in   favor of a logic t hat  does  not  t olerat e s uch p as s ages  b et ween op p os ing s ens es   of  t he  s ame  word  .  .  ."  (p p .98 ­9 9 ).    T rans lat ions   are  als o  guilt y  of  imp os ing   lit eralit y  on  a  t ex t ,  or  on  a  s et  of meanings .  What  act ually hap p ens , Derrida  as s ert s ,  is   t hat   t he  t ex t   d ef er s   t he  meaning,  and  s o  t he  clear  dis t inct ions   of  Plat o  are  t hus   b lurred­­`eit her/ or'  t urns   out   t o  b e  `b ot h/ and.'  He emp has izes   t hat  op p os it ions  as s ert  t hems elves  in meaning, and, aft er rep eat ing t his  p oint   a d   n a u s ea m,  he  concludes   b y  res t at ing  his   main  t hes is :  "Non­p res ence  is   p res ence. Différance, t he dis ap p earance of any originary p res ence, is a t  o n ce   t he  condit ion  of  p os s ib ilit y   a n d   t he  condit ion  of  t he  imp os s ib ilit y  of  t rut h"  (p .16 8 ). 
All  he  has   done  here,  I  am  s ugges t ing,  is   t o   a s s er t   his   main  p oint s   over  and  over  again;   he  offers   no  argument   or  reas ons   for  why  we  s hould   accep t  thes e point s  as t rue.  One will search in vain for any dis cus s ion of t he  nat ures   of  language,  int ent ionalit y,  meaning,  knowledge  or  t rut h  aimed  at   convincing  t he  reader  t hat   Derrida's   key  as s ert ions   are  t rue.    It   is   for  t his   reas on t hat  one cannot  help  b eing s us p icious  of t he ob s cure writ ing s t yle t hat   is  t yp ical of p os t modernis m, es p ecially of Derrida's  own work.  Derrida asserts   his   main  t hes es   ab out   language  and  realit y,  ab out   t ex t s   and  t heir  meanings ,  every few pages  in mos t  of his  main works , us ually b eneat h layers  of rap idly   changing, and oft en b arely p enet rab le, met ap hors , doub le and triple meanings,  mult ip le references , p uns , imaginat ive and oft en s hocking imagery.  Although   t his   writ ing  s t yle  is   very  difficult   t o  p enet rat e  (and  indeed  is   very  clever  and   creat ive),  I  s ub mit   t hat   int erwoven  t hroughout   Derrida's   many  readings   of  p hilos op hical t ex t s  lurks  mainly t his  one s ub s t ant ive claim rep eat ed over and   over again, and t hat  once one dis cerns  his  p hilos op hical s t yle, one can read his   work quit e eas ily. 
17  If Derrida cont inues  t o ins is t  t hat  he is  not  p rop os ing a met ap hys ical   t hes is  he mus t  show why not .  He simp ly cannot  make what  for all t he world   ap p ears   t o  b e  a  s et   of  met ap hys ical  claims   ab out   language,  meaning,  and   t ex t ual  analys is   and  yet   claim t hat   t hey  are n o t   met ap hys ical claims wi t h o u t   exp l a i n i n g  wh y n o t .  T his  mis t ake of confus ing as sertion with argument is also   very common in the work of Derrida's  dis cip les . 
3 ) Deco n s t r u ct i o n  i s  g u i l t y o f  r el a t i vi s m:  T his  is  p robably one of the  mos t   t renchant   crit icis ms   of  decons t ruct ion,  and  ex p lains   why   decons t ruct ionis t  t hinkers  do all in t heir p ower t o avoid t his  charge, and b ury   t heir point s  under mount ains  of ob s cure language and terminology.  But  it  is   fair  t o  s ay  t hat   decons t ruct ion  is   guilt y  of  b ot h  ep is t emological  and  moral   relat ivis m. 
It  is  int eres t ing t o p rob e t his  is s ue b y as king t he q ues t ion of whet her  or  not   a  decons t ruct ionis t   reading  of  a  t ex t   could   f a i l ,  or  b e  wrong,  on   Derrida's   view?    Would  it   b e  p os s ib le  t o  decons t ruct   a  t ex t   i n co r r ect l y ?;   t o   offer an int erp ret at ion which was  not  legit imat e?  For ex amp le, when teaching
10 


Plat o's   Eu t h yp h r o ,  s up p os e  a  p rofes s or  p rop os ed  t he  int erp ret at ion  t hat   Eut hyp hro  was   really  p laying  wit h  Socrat es ;   t hat   he  knows   t he  ans wer  t o   Socrat es 's   q ues t ions   all  along,  and  fully  unders t ands  the dis t inct ion bet ween   moralit y  and  religion,  b ut   t hinks   t hat   Socrat es 's   views   on  t hes e  mat t ers   are  s illy, s o he delib erat ely leads  Socrat es  on s o t hat  he can lat er ridicule him to his   friends .  O r s up p os e t hat  we read Hu ckl eb er r y Fi n n as  proposing the view that   J im is  a racis t .  Or t hat  Huck is  a racis t .  Or t hat  the novel is  not  ab out  racial   is s ues  at  all, b ut  is  really ab out  t he Mis s is s ip p i river, which is  a met ap hor for  life.  O r s up p os e we decide t o read Charles  Dickens ' novels  as  b eing p rimarily   ab out   child  ab us e.    T he  q ues t ion  is :  are  t hes e  readings   accep t ab le?    It   is   ob vious  that t his  is  a crucial ques t ion. 
If  a  decons t ruct ionis t   reading  of  a  t ex t   could  not   fail,  t his   s eems   t o   imp ly  t hat   a n y   reading  of  a  t ex t   i s   legit imat e,  and  if  it   could  fail,  which  (we  now know from our reading of "Plat o's  Pharmacy") is  Derrida's official answer  t o  our  q ues t ion,  t hen  yet   again  we  are  cons t rained  b y  t he  met ap hys ics   of  p res ence.    For  we  have  s een  t hat   Derrida  b elieves   t hat   alt ernat ive  readings   mus t   s t ill  have  genuine  links   t o  t he  t ex t .    So  a  "correct "  decons t ruct ionis t   reading imp lies  t hat  t here are cert ain readings  which are legitimate, and certain   readings  which are not  legit imat e.  When we work wit h a t ex t , we mus t  reveal   only  t he  legit imat e  readings .    T here is  a r i g h t and a wr o n g way to read tex t s   for Derrida after all, it  is  jus t  a lit t le b it  more elas t ic t han t he t radit ional right   way.  But  t his  p air of ident it ies  illus t rat es  again t hat  we are unab le to avoid the  met ap hys ics  of pres ence.  Now if Derrida claims  t hat  when we read t ex t s  our  only t as k is  t o reveal t he op erat ion of d i f f ér a n ce in t he t ex t ­­which means that   we cannot  p rivilege t he lit eral meaning­­he is  s t ill claiming t hat  t here is a right   way and a wrong way t o read t ex t s , and s o is  s t ill undermining his position that   a l l readings  can b e decons t ruct ed.  But  it  is  fuzzines s  ab out  jus t  t hes e kinds of  is s ues   which  has   right ly  earned  Derrida  and  his   dis cip les   t he  rep ut at ion  for  advocat ing  t he  view  t hat   meaning,  and  s t andard  logic  and  rat ionalit y,  are  arb it rary. 
Let   us   b riefly  glance  b ack  at   t he  s ugges t ions   I  made  for  alt ernat ive  readings   of  well­known  t ex t s .    Sup p os e  t hat   ins t ead  of  s aying  t hat   Hu ckl eb er r y Fi n n is  ab out  t he Mis s is s ip p i River, which is  a met aphor for life,  we  s aid  t hat   t he  novel  is   ab out   t he  Mis s is s ip p i  River,  and  t he  river  is   a  met ap hor  for  t he  op p res s ion  of  worldviews ,  es p ecially  unconvent ional   worldviews .  O ne can s ee immediat ely how t his  int erp ret at ion would appeal to   decons t ruct ionis t  t hinkers  b ecaus e it  s up p ort s  t heir p olit ical agenda.  In s hort,  t hey might  b e inclined t o accep t  t his  reading as  legit imat e.  O r t o put it another  way:  t his   is   t he  kind  of  alt ernat ive  reading  which  t hey  would  likely  come  up   wit h  t hems elves ,  or  which  t hey  would  s up p ort .    However,  t his   t hought   ex p eriment   illus t rat es   t he  nat ure  of  t he  difficult y  for  t he  decons t ruct ionis t .  T his   reading  has  no more legit imacy than any ot her reading if any reading is   p ermis s ib le;   it   cannot   b e  morally  b et t er,  or  t ex t ually  more  ap p rop riat e,  or  p hilos op hically more accep t ab le t han t he ot her alt ernat ives  I ment ioned.  T he
11 


only  reas on  a  group   might   work  wit h  t his   reading  is   t hat   it   s up p ort s   t heir  b ias es   and  p rejudices   and  int eres t s , which have been formed by their cult ure  and t radit ion and p ers onal s it uat ion, b ut  which are not  objectively true.  Hence,  decons t ruct ion  is   commit t ed  t o  moral  relat ivis m  in  t he  s ens e  t hat   no  s et   of  meanings   is   morally  p referab le  t o  any  ot her,  and  it   is   commit t ed  t o   ep is t emological  relat ivis m  b ecaus e  any  reading  of  a  t ex t  can be s hown to b e  legit imat e.  If on t he ot her hand, t o avoid t his  difficulty, postmodernist thinkers   ins is t   t hat   t h ei r   reading  or  int erp ret at ion  is   right   or  t rue  or  b et t er  t han  ot her  alt ernat ives ,  t hen  t hey  are  recognizing  a  realm  of  ob ject ive  t rut h,  which   undermines   t he  whole  p roject   of  decons t ruct ion.    Furt her,  and  jus t   as   imp ort ant , if t hey choos e t his  lat t er op t ion t hey are now ob liged t o debate with   ot hers  who agree t hat  t here is  a realm of ob ject ive t rut h, b ut  who disagree with   t he  decons t ruct ionis t s   ab out   it s   nat ure.    T hes e  difficult ies   us ually  leave  decons t ruct ionis t s  wit h an incons is t ent  relat ivis m, and it is no wonder that they   do t heir b es t  t o ob fus cat e t his  fact .  T his  p romp t s  us  t o s t at e t his  inconsistency   more ex p licit ly. 
18  4 ) Deco n s t r u ct i o n  i s  s el f ­co n t r a d i ct o r y :  Let  me t urn now to the self­  cont radict ory  nat ure  of  decons t ruct ion.    T he  t wo  realms   of  p res ence  and  of   d i f f ér a n ce   ident ified  b y  Derrida  are  p art   of  his   overall  view  ( h i s   ob ject ive,  "G od's  eye" view) of how t hings  really are.  T hey are s up p os ed t o reveal t o us   what  is  really t he cas e, or how ob ject s r ea l l y s t a n d .  T he realm of d i f f ér a n ce ,  in  p art icular,  informs   us   t hat   ob ject s   are  never  s elf­cont ained,  never  s elf­ident ical,  never  cont ain  t heir  es s ence  s imp ly  wit hin  t hems elves ,  b ut   are  always   es s ent ially  "influenced"  b y  t hos e  ot her  "ob ject s "  in  t he  s ys t em  (what ever t his  could p os s ib ly mean in p ract ice).  But  s ince this "influencing" is   cons t ant ly changing and b eing deferred, meaning, and hence any ident it ies  or  p res ences  or lit eral meanings  which emerge in and t hrough meaning, are never  t he whole s t ory.  However, if all t his  is  t he cas e, t hen, for Derrida, it  would b e   t r u e   t o  s ay  t hat   realit y  is   d i f f ér a n ce ,  and  not   p res ence.    T his   p oint   is   nicely   s up p ort ed  b y  t he  fact   t hat   Derrida's   works   are  full  of  s ub s t ant ive  (or  met ap hys ical)  claims   a b o u t   t h e  n a t u r es   o f   l a n g u a g e  a n d   mea n i n g ,  e.g.,  "Writ ing  can  never  b e  t ot ally  inhab it ed  b y  t he  voice." 19  O r:  "T he   t r a ce   is   not hing, it  is  not  an ent it y, it  ex ceeds  the ques t ion Wh a t  i s ? and cont ingent ly   makes  it p os s ib le." 20  O r: ". . . t he not ions  of p rop ert y, ap p rop riat ion and s elf­  p res ence, s o cent ral to logocent ric met ap hys ics , are es s ent ially dep endent  on   an  op p os it ional  relat ion  wit h  ot hernes s .    In  t his   s ens e,  ident it y p r es u p p o s es   alt erit y." 21  T hes e  are  t he   l i t er a l   mea n i n g s   which  Derrida  wis hes   us   t o  t ake  away from h i s t ex t s .  T his  p oint  is  furt her confirmed in t he work of Derrida's   dis cip les ,  which  is   als o  rep let e  wit h  met ap hys ical  claims ;   J as p er  Neel,  for  ex amp le,  illus t rat es   t his   very  ap t ly  indeed  when  he  s ays  "Plat o is  wrong and   Derrida is  right ." 
T he  cont radict ion is  ob vious : if we o u g h t  to read Plat o according to   t he  p rincip les   of  decons t ruct ion,  t hen  t his   is   a   met a p h ys i ca l   claim about  the  nat ure of knowledge, and Derrida is  cont radict ing his  general view that there is
12 


no one legit imat e met hod for reading and int erp ret ing t ex t s .  O r, on t he ot her  hand,  if  he  s ays   t hat   t he  decons t ruct ion  of  Plat o  is   only  a   s u g g es t i o n ,  one  p os s ib ilit y  among  ot hers ,  t hen  we  are  (met ap hys ically)  free  t o  reject   it ,  and   t here is  not hing wrong wit h p rivileging l i t er a l meanings  aft er all.  But  this too   is  a cont radict ion b ecaus e he has  b een t rying t o p ers uade us  t hat  we should not   p rivilege lit eral meanings . 
T his   is   a  s t raight forward  logical  difficult y  wit h  t he  p hilos op hy   of  decons t ruct ion.    Decons t ruct ionis t s   s omet imes   rep ly  t o  t his   p oint   b y  s aying   t hat   t heir  t heory  is   not   vulnerab le  t o  logical  crit icis ms   b ecaus e  logic  it s elf  is   p recis ely  what   is   b eing  called  int o  q ues t ion,  at   leas t   at   t he  b eginning  of  t he  enq uiry.  Since t hey are calling logic int o q ues t ion, t hey are not  ans werab le t o   logical ob ject ions .  However, t his  is  clearly a q ues t ion­b egging move.  For it is   ex act ly t h i s  p o i n t ab out  logic which Derrida and his  dis cip les  are s up p os ed to   b e es t ab lis hing.  This  conclus ion can only come (if it  comes  at  all) at  t he en d   of  t he  enq uiry.    O ne  cannot  ass ume it s  truth in the premis es  of the argument   wit hout   b egging  t he  q ues t ion.    I  b elieve  t hat   t his   logical  p rob lem  is   ins urmount ab le, and p rovides  a reas on for why s ome p hilos op hers  like Rort y   are  p rop elled  t oward  a  wholes cale  relat ivis m  of  t he  Derridean  variet y.  (Whet her t hey act ually maint ain t his  relat ivis m co n s i s t en t l y , es p ecially in t he  et hical domain, is  anot her ques t ion, of cours e.) 
Derrida  is   well  known  for  making  t he  claim  t hat   it   is   p os s ib le  t o   decons t ruct  his o wn work.  But  t his  claim mus t  b e unders t ood in the context of  t he  ab ove  crit ical  dis cus s ion.    For  t his   can  only  mean  (a)  t hat   different   concep t s ,  met ap hors ,  et c.,  could  b e  emp loyed  t o  illus t rat e  t he  realit y  of   d i f f ér a n ce , b ut  it  cannot  mean (b ) t hat d i f f ér a n ce mi g h t  n o t  b e the way things   r ea l l y a r e .  T hat  is  t o s ay, he can only mean b y claiming t hat  his own work can   b e decons t ruct ed t hat  t he s u b s t a n t i ve p oint s  he is making about deconstruction   could  b e exp r es s ed   or   i l l u s t r a t ed   in  a  different  way (which is  really a t rivial   p oint ).  But  he cannot  mean t hat  we could read his  works  and deconstruct them  in s uch a way as  t o conclude t hat  his  met ap hys ical or s ub s t ant ive claims about   how t ex t s  ought  t o b e read (and ab out language and realit y) are not t r u e .  For  if  we  could  read  Derrida  in  t his   way,  t hen  we  would  b e  free  t o  reject   t he  decons t ruct ionis t  app roach to t ex t s , and adop t  the tradit ional app roach! 
5 )   Deco n s t r u ct i o n   i s   g u i l t y  o f   i n t el l ect u a l   a r r o g a n ce  b eca u s e  i t s   p r o p o n en t s   i n s i s t   t h a t   t h ei r   ma i n   cl a i ms   ca n   s t i l l   h a ve  t h e  i mp o r t   o f   t r u t h   even   i f   t h e  cl a i ms   a r e  f a l s e :    T his   las t   crit icis m  is   very  nicely  illus t rat ed  in   s ome remarks  b y Lawrence Cahoone.  I q uot e him here b ecaus e his  ap p roach   will help  to b ring some of t he p oint s  I have b een making t oget her, and it  als o   illus t rat es   t he  t ot ally  q ues t ion­b egging  nat ure  of  p os t modernis t   p hilos op hy.  Here  is   Cahoone  comment ing  on  s ome  of  t he  crit icis ms   levelled  at   p os t modernis m:  
The  charge  of  self­ contr adiction  is  an imp or tant  one;  nevertheless, it is a purely   negative argument that does nothing to b lunt the criticisms p ostmodernism makes of
13  


tr aditional  inq uir y.    The  sometimes  ob scur e  r hetor ical  str ategies  of  p ostmodernism  make sense if one accep ts its critiq ue of such inq uir y.  To say then that the postmodern   critiq ue is invalid b ecause the kind of theor y it p r oduces does not meet the standards of   tr aditional  or   nor mal  inq uir y  is  a  r ather  weak  counterattack.    It  says  in  effect  that  whatever critiq ue does not advance the interests of tr aditional inq uir y is invalid.  The  same  charge  was  made  against  the very patr on saint of philosop hy, Socr ates, whose  infernal  q uestioning,  it  was  said,  led  to  nothing  p ositive  and  p r actical,  undermined  socially imp or tant b eliefs, and could not justify itself excep t for  his eccentr ic claim to   b e  on  a  mission  fr om  God  ( in  Plato's   Ap o lo g y) .    So,  while  the  thr eat  of  self­   contr adiction does r aise a serious p r ob lem for  p ostmodernism, one that would prevent  p ostmodernism fr om r egarding itself as valid in the way tr aditional p hilosop hies hope  to  b e,  that  fact  does  nothing  to  show  that  nor mal  inq uir y  is  immune  to  its  critiq ue.  Postmodernism  r aises  a  serious  challenge  which  cannot  b e  so  easily  dismissed.  Whether  it  is   rig h t,  is,  of  cour se,  another  matter,  and  one  that  is  up   to  the  r eader  to  22  decide. 
What  is  very revealing ab out  Cahoone's  p os it ion is  t hat  he ob vious ly b elieves   t hat  even though decons t ruct ion may be cont radict ory, it  can s t ill funct ion as   an effect ive crit iq ue of t radit ional p hilos op hy!  T his  kind of claim is obviously   fals e, and rep res ent s  yet  anot her s light  of hand from t he decons t ruct ionis t s .  It   is  t rue t hat  t he charge of s elf­cont radict ion is  mos t ly a negat ive argument , b ut   t his   is   ap p rop riat e  b ecaus e  it   s t ill  demons t rat es   t hat   decons t ruct ion  is   eit her  cont radict ory  or  relat ivis t ic,  as   I  have  ex p lained  ab ove,  and  t hes e  are  b ot h   ex cellent  reas ons  for reject ing it .  It  is  a devas t at ing counter­attack, not a rather  weak one.  O r does  Cahoone t hink t hat  if he s up p ort s  a s elf­cont radict ory or a  relat ivis t ic  p hilos op hy,  he  does   not   have  t o  defend  it ,  and  t hat   t he  b urden  of  p roof is  on his  op p onent s ? 
Cahoone  s ugges t s   t hat   b ecaus e  t radit ional  p hilos op hy  ins is t s   on   s t andards   of  logic  and  rat ionalit y,  it   cannot   offer  a  s erious   at t ack  on   p os t modernis m.    Now  why  is   t his ?    Is   it   b ecaus e  p os t modernis m  reject s   t radit ional s t andards  of logic and rat ionalit y?  I hop e I have s hown ab ove t hat   t his  claim is  t ot ally unconvincing b ecaus e it  is  as s ert ed and not argued for, and   is   s imp ly  q ues t ion­b egging.    O r  is   it   b ecaus e  t rut h  is   relat ive  (which  would   als o  include  logic  and  rat ionalit y  in  t his   cas e)?    T his   move  is   als o  q ues t ion­  b egging becaus e this  is  what  Cahoone is  supp os ed to es t ab lis h, s o he cannot   a s s u me   it   in  his   crit iq ue  of  t radit ional  p hilos op hy.    (Furt her,  of  cours e,  p os t modernis t s  us ually t ry t o deny t hat  t rut h is  relat ive.)  It  is  als o s ugges t ive  t o  not e  t he  rhet oric  emp loyed  b y  Cahoone.    Ins t ead  of  t alking  ab out   "t he  t radit ional  s t andards   of  logic  and  rat ionalit y,"  he  t alks   ab out   "advancing t he  int eres t s   of  t radit ional  inq uiry"  t hereb y  t rying  t o  carry  his   argument   b y   invoking well­es t ab lis hed cont emp orary rhet oric, which s ugges t s  op p res s ion   and  ex clus ion.    Cahoone  is   clearly  s aying  t hat   t he  p os t modernis t   crit iq ue  of  t radit ional  p hilos op hy  can   funct ion  even  if  p os t modernis m  t urns   out   t o  b e  cont radict ory.    T his   again  is   a  good  illus t rat ion  of  how  t he  p os t modernis t s   want  t o have t heir cake and eat  it : t hey want  t o avoid offering any argument  in
14 


s up p ort   of  t heir  main  claims   (b ecaus e  t hes e  claims   are  indefens ib le,  for  t he  reas ons  I have ex p lained ab ove), and yet  claim t hat  t heir p hilos op hical res ults   are st ill valid. 
In general, decons t ruct ionis t  t hinkers  avoid facing up  t o t hes e crit ical   p oint s   I  have  rais ed  ab ove,  and  oft en  t ry  t o  dodge  t hem.    It   is   virt ually   imp os s ib le to find a mains t ream work in decons t ruct ionis t  p hilos op hy which   acknowledges   t hes e  difficult ies ,  and  t ries   t o  deal  wit h  t hem,  like  any  hones t   t hinker  s hould.    Pos t modernis t s   know  very  well  t hat   t heir  work  is   op en  t o   charges  of s elf­cont radict ion, relat ivis m, lack of p hilos op hical foundation and   int ellect ual  arrogance,  and  s ince  t hes e  p os it ions   are  not orious ly  difficult   t o   defend, it  is  not  s urp ris ing t hat  t hey t ry t o deflect  t he clear light  of reason from  landing  on  t heir  ideas .    T hey  do  t his   b y  adop t ing  a  very  ob s cure  and  almos t   imp enet rab le  writ ing  s t yle,  and  it   is   no  wonder  t hat   t his   s t yle  makes   many   p hilos op hers  susp icious  that what  we are really s eeing here is  t he King's  new   clot hes  b et ween t he covers !  But  t here is  a very s erious  p oint  here, which I will   s t at e  in  t he  form  of  t wo  q ues t ions   (wit h  which  I  will  conclude):  is   it   not   int ellect ually  irres p ons ib le  t o  avoid  facing  up   t o  legit imat e  and  oft en­rais ed   crit icis ms  of one's  ideas  b y s erious  t hinkers ?  And, las t ly, s hould we­­can we­­  t ake a p hilos op hy serious ly that refus es  to do so? 
ENDNO T ES 
1 .  Th e  Po s t mo d er n   Co n d i t i o n :  A  Rep o r t   o n   Kn o wl ed g e   (Minneap olis :   Univers it y of Minnes ot a Pres s , 1 9 8 4 ) p. xx iv. 
2 . Derrida's  major works  include: S p eech  a n d  Ph en o men a  a n d  Ot h er  Es s a ys
15 


i n  Hu s s er l ' s  Th eo r y o f  S i g n s , t rans . b y D. B. Allis on (Evanston: Northwestern   U.P.,  1 9 7 3 );   Of   Gr a mma t o l o g y ,  t rans .  b y  G .  Sp ivak  (Balt imore:  J ohns   Hop kins ,  1 9 7 6 );   Wr i t i n g   a n d   Di f f er en ce ,  t rans .  b y  A.  Bas s   (Chicago:   Univers it y  of  Chicago  Pres s ,  1 9 7 8 );   Di s s emi n a t i o n ,  t rans .  b y  B.  J ohns on   (Chicago: Univers it y of Chicago Pres s , 1 9 8 1 ); Ma r g i n s  o f  Ph i l o s o p h y , trans.  b y A. Bas s  (Chicago: Univers it y of Chicago Pres s , 1 9 8 2 ); Gl a s , t rans . b y J.P.  Leavey, J r. and R. Rand (Lincoln: Univers it y of Neb ras ka Pres s , 1 9 8 6 ).  See  als o  a  s eries   of  int erviews   wit h  Derrida  in   Po s i t i o n s ,  t rans .  b y  A.  Bas s   (Chicago: Univers it y of Chicago Pres s , 1 9 8 1 ).  For a brief but helpful synopsis   of  Derrida's   major  works   b y  S.  Crit chley  and  T .  Mooney,  s ee   Twen t i et h   Cen t u r y Con t i n en t a l  Ph i l o s o p h y , ed. Richard Kearney (London: Rout ledge,  1 9 9 4 ) pp . 4 6 0 ­4 6 7 . 
3 .  Ma r g i n s   o f   Ph i l o s o p h y ,  p p .  2 1 ­2 5 .    See  als o  Derrida's   remarks   in  his   int erview wit h Richard Kearney in Kearney's   Di a l o g u es  wi t h  Co n t emp o r a r y  Co n t i n en t a l  Th i n ker s (Manches t er: Manches t er U.P., 1 9 8 4 ) p . 1 1 0 ­1 1 1 , and   p . 1 1 7 . 
4 .  See   Wr i t i n g   a n d   Di f f er en ce ,  p p .  1 1 2 ­1 1 3 .    T he  fact   t hat   t he  realm  of   d i f f ér a n ce never occurs  wit hout  cognit ive knowledge als o means  t hat  we a r e   imp ris oned in language, an imp licat ion of his  t hought  which Derrida wishes to   res is t  (s ee R. Kearney, Di a l o g u es  wi t h  Co n t emp o r a r y Co n t i n en t a l  Th inkers,  p . 1 2 3 ).   But  if all ident it ies  are co n s t r u ct s of t he mind, and we cannot operate  wit hout   ident it ies  in our dis cours e and language, t hen it  seems  to follow that  we are imp ris oned in language.  T o look at  t he is s ue from anot her angle, if, as   Derrida  b elieves ,  t here  are  no  ident it ies   b eyond  language,  for  all  p ract ical   p urp os es  t his  amount s  t o t he s ame t hing as  s aying t hat  t here is nothing beyond   language. 
5 .  As   des crib ed  b y  J ohn  St urrock  in   S t r u ct u r a l i s m  a n d   S i n ce ,  ed.  J ohn   St urrock (Ox ford: Ox ford U.P., 1 9 7 9 ) p. 58 . 
6 . Rea l i t y Is n ' t  Wh a t  i t  Us ed  t o  Be (San Francis co: Harp er and Row, 1 9 9 0) p.  8 7 . 
7 .  See  "Is   Derrida  a  T rans cendent al  Philos op her?,"  Wo r ki n g   Th r o u g h   Der r i d a ,  ed.  G ary  B.  Madis on  (Evans t on:  Nort hwes t ern  U.P.,  1 9 9 3 )  p p .  1 3 7 ­1 4 6 . 
8 . Ib i d ., p. 13 7 . 
9 . Ib i d .
16 


1 0 .  See   Of   Gr a mma t o l o g y ,  p p .  1 0 ­1 8 ,  and  p .  4 3 ,  for  a  dis cus s ion  of  "logocent ricis m." 
1 1 . Dis s eminat ion, p p . 9 8 ­9 9 . 
1 2 . See Yoav Rinon, "T he Rhet oric of J acq ues  Derrida I: Plat o's  Pharmacy,"  Revi ew  o f   Met a p h ys i cs   4 6   (1 9 9 2 )  p p .  3 6 9 ­3 8 6 ,  and  Yoav  Rinon,  "T he  Rhet oric of J acq ues  Derrida II: Ph a ed r u s ," Revi ew o f  Met a p h ys i cs 4 6  (1993)  p p .  5 3 7 ­5 5 8 .    It   is   ins t ruct ive  t o  comp are  Rinon's   reading  wit h  Chris t op her  Norris 's  in his Der r i d a (Camb ridge: Harvard U.P., 1 9 8 7 ) pp . 2 8 ­4 5 . 
1 3 . Di s s emi n a t i o n , p . 1 2 9 . 
1 4 . Ib i d ., p. 13 0 . 
1 5 . Ib i d ., p. 69 . 
1 6 . Again, t he concep t  of s up p res s ion s ugges t s  t hat  t o ignore t hes e meanings   is mo r a l l y inap p rop riat e. 
1 7 . For ot her ex amp les  of Derrida's  failure t o p rovide an argument  t o s up p ort   his  radical as s ert ions , s ee Wr i t i n g  a n d  Di f f er en ce , p p . 1 7 8 ­1 8 1 ; pp. 278­282;   Of  Gr a mma t o l o g y , p p . 6 ­1 5 ;  pp . 3 0 ­3 8 ;  p p . 4 4 ­5 0 ; Ma r g i n s  o f  Ph i l o s o p h y ,  p p .  1 ­2 7 ;   p p .  9 5 ­1 0 8 ;   p p .  2 0 9 ­2 1 9 .  (Derrida's   amb ivalence  b et ween   rep et it ion/ demons t rat ion is  int eres t ingly alluded to in Po s i t i o n s , p . 5 2 .)  T he  s ame problem is  ob vious  in much of the secondary lit erat ure on Derrida.  As   an illus t rat ion, s ee Chris t op her Norris , Der r i d a , es p ecially Chap t ers  Two and   T hree.    See  als o  J onat han  Culler's   es s ay  on  Derrida  in   S t r u ct u r a l i s m  a n d   S i n ce , ed. J ohn St urrock (O x ford: O x ford U.P., 1 9 7 9 ) p p . 1 5 4 ­1 8 0 .  Culler's   es s ay  p res ent s   a  well­organized,  clear  and  readab le  overview  of  Derrida's   major t hes es  ab out  language, realit y, meaning and t ex t ual analys is , b ut  offers   no  argument s   or  reas ons   for  why  we should accep t  thes e claims  as t rue or at  leas t   p laus ib le.    Dallas   Willard  argues   forcefully  in  a  recent   es s ay  t hat   Derrida's   view  of  int ent ionalit y  is   s imilarly  afflict ed  b y  t he  ab s ence  of  s up p ort ing  reas ons   and  argument .    Willard  illus t rat es   t hat   it   is   not   s o  much   t hat  Derrida's  account  of int ent ionalit y is  wrong as  t hat  it  is  really no account   at  all of int ent ionalit y.  See Dallas  Willard, "Predication as Originary Violence:   A Phenomenological Crit iq ue of Derrida's  View of Int ent ionalit y" in Working   Th r o u g h  Der r i d a , ed. G ary B. Madis on, p p . 1 2 0 ­1 3 6 . 
1 8 . Ma r g i n s  of  Ph i l o s o p h y , p . 9 5 . 
1 9 . Of  Gr a mma t o l o g y , p . 7 5 .
17 


2 0 . Derrida is  his  int erview wit h Richard Kearney in Kearney's Dialogues with   Co n t emp o r a r y Con t i n en t a l  Thi n ker s , p . 1 1 7 . 
2 1 .  Pl a t o ,  Der r i d a   a n d   Wr i t i n g   (Carb ondale:  Sout hern  Illinois   Univers it y   Pres s , 1 9 8 8 ) p. xii. 
2 2 . Fr o m Po s t mo d er n i s m t o  Mo d er n i s m: An  An t h o l o g y (O x ford: Blackwell,  1 9 9 5 )  p .  2 1 .  2 2 .  Th e  Po s t mo d er n   Co n d i t i o n :  A  Rep o r t   o n   Kn o wl ed g e   (Minneap olis : Univers it y of Minnes ot a Pres s , 1 9 8 4 ) p. xx iv. 
2 2 . Derrida's  major works  include: S p eech  a n d  Ph en o mena and Other Essays   i n  Hu s s er l ' s  Th eo r y o f  S i g n s , t rans . b y D. B. Allis on (Evanston: Northwestern   U.P.,  1 9 7 3 );   Of   Gr a mma t o l o g y ,  t rans .  b y  G .  Sp ivak  (Balt imore:  J ohns   Hop kins ,  1 9 7 6 );   Wr i t i n g   a n d   Di f f er en ce ,  t rans .  b y  A.  Bas s   (Chicago:   Univers it y  of  Chicago  Pres s ,  1 9 7 8 );   Di s s emi n a t i o n ,  t rans .  b y  B.  J ohns on   (Chicago: Univers it y of Chicago Pres s , 1 9 8 1 ); Ma r g i n s  o f  Ph i l o s o p h y , trans.  b y A. Bas s  (Chicago: Univers it y of Chicago Pres s , 1 9 8 2 ); Gl a s , t rans . b y J.P.  Leavey, J r. and R. Rand (Lincoln: Univers it y of Neb ras ka Pres s , 1 9 8 6 ).  See  als o  a  s eries   of  int erviews   wit h  Derrida  in   Po s i t i o n s ,  t rans .  b y  A.  Bas s   (Chicago: Univers it y of Chicago Pres s , 1 9 8 1 ).  For a brief but helpful synopsis   of  Derrida's   major  works   b y  S.  Crit chley  and  T .  Mooney,  s ee   Twen t i et h   Cen t u r y Con t i n en t a l  Ph i l o s o p h y , ed. Richard Kearney (London: Rout ledge,  1 9 9 4 ) pp . 4 6 0 ­4 6 7 . 
2 2 .  Ma r g i n s   o f   Ph i l o s o p h y ,  p p .  2 1 ­2 5 .    See  als o  Derrida's   remarks   in  his   int erview wit h Richard Kearney in Kearney's   Di a l o g u es  wi t h  Co n t emp o r a r y  Co n t i n en t a l  Th i n ker s (Manches t er: Manches t er U.P., 1 9 8 4 ) p . 1 1 0 ­1 1 1 , and   p . 1 1 7 . 
2 2 .  See   Wr i t i n g   a n d   Di f f er en ce ,  p p .  1 1 2 ­1 1 3 .    T he  fact   t hat   t he  realm  of   d i f f ér a n ce never occurs  wit hout  cognit ive knowledge als o means  t hat  we a r e   imp ris oned in language, an imp licat ion of his  t hought  which Derrida wishes to   res is t  (s ee R. Kearney, Di a l o g u es  wi t h  Co n t emp o r a r y Co n t i n en t a l  Th inkers,  p . 1 2 3 ).   But  if all ident it ies  are co n s t r u ct s of t he mind, and we cannot operate  wit hout   ident it ies  in our dis cours e and language, t hen it  seems  to follow that  we are imp ris oned in language.  T o look at  t he is s ue from anot her angle, if, as   Derrida  b elieves ,  t here  are  no  ident it ies   b eyond  language,  for  all  p ract ical   p urp os es  t his  amount s  t o t he s ame t hing as  s aying t hat  t here is nothing beyond   language. 
2 2 .  As   des crib ed  b y  J ohn  St urrock  in   S t r u ct u r a l i s m  a n d   S i n ce ,  ed.  J ohn   St urrock (Ox ford: Ox ford U.P., 1 9 7 9 ) p. 58 .
18 


2 2 . Rea l i t y Isn ' t  Wh a t  i t  Us ed  t o  Be (San Francis co: Harp er and Row, 1 9 9 0 )  p . 8 7 . 
7 .  See  "Is   Derrida  a  T rans cendent al  Philos op her?,"  Wo r ki n g   Th r o u g h   Der r i d a ,  ed.  G ary  B.  Madis on  (Evans t on:  Nort hwes t ern  U.P.,  1 9 9 3 )  p p .  1 3 7 ­1 4 6 . 
2 2 . Ib i d ., p. 13 7 . 
2 2 . Ib i d
2 2 .  See   Of   Gr a mma t o l o g y ,  p p .  1 0 ­1 8 ,  and  p .  4 3 ,  for  a  dis cus s ion  of  "logocent ricis m." 
2 2 . Dis s eminat ion, p p . 9 8 ­9 9 . 
2 2 . See Yoav Rinon, "T he Rhet oric of J acq ues  Derrida I: Plat o's  Pharmacy,"  Revi ew  o f   Met a p h ys i cs   4 6   (1 9 9 2 )  p p .  3 6 9 ­3 8 6 ,  and  Yoav  Rinon,  "T he  Rhet oric of J acq ues  Derrida II: Ph a ed r u s ," Revi ew o f  Met a p h ys i cs 4 6  (1993)  p p .  5 3 7 ­5 5 8 .    It   is   ins t ruct ive  t o  comp are  Rinon's   reading  wit h  Chris t op her  Norris 's  in his Der r i d a (Camb ridge: Harvard U.P., 1 9 8 7 ) pp . 2 8 ­4 5 . 
2 2 . Di s s emi n a t i o n , p . 1 2 9 . 
2 2 . Ib i d ., p. 13 0 . 
2 2 . Ib i d ., p. 69 . 
2 2 . Again, t he concep t  of s up p res s ion s ugges t s  t hat  t o ignore t hes e meanings   is mo r a l l y inap p rop riat e. 
2 2 . For ot her ex amp les  of Derrida's  failure t o p rovide an argument  t o s up p ort   his  radical as s ert ions , s ee Wr i t i n g  a n d  Di f f er en ce , p p . 1 7 8 ­1 8 1 ; pp. 278­282;   Of  Gr a mma t o l o g y , p p . 6 ­1 5 ;  pp . 3 0 ­3 8 ;  p p . 4 4 ­5 0 ; Ma r g i n s  o f  Ph i l o s o p h y ,  p p .  1 ­2 7 ;   p p .  9 5 ­1 0 8 ;   p p .  2 0 9 ­2 1 9 .    (Derrida's   amb ivalence  b et ween   rep et it ion/ demons t rat ion is  int eres t ingly alluded to in Po s i t i o n s , p . 5 2 .)  T he  s ame problem is  ob vious  in much of the secondary lit erat ure on Derrida.  As   an illus t rat ion, s ee Chris t op her Norris , Der r i d a , es p ecially Chap t ers  Two and   T hree.    See  als o  J onat han  Culler's   es s ay  on  Derrida  in   S t r u ct u r a l i s m  a n d   S i n ce , ed. J ohn St urrock (O x ford: O x ford U.P., 1 9 7 9 ) p p . 1 5 4 ­1 8 0 .  Culler's   es s ay  p res ent s   a  well­organized,  clear  and  readab le  overview  of  Derrida's   major t hes es  ab out  language, realit y, meaning and t ex t ual analys is , b ut  offers   no  argument s   or  reas ons   for  why  we should accep t  thes e claims  as t rue or at  leas t   p laus ib le.    Dallas   Willard  argues   forcefully  in  a  recent   es s ay  t hat
19 


Derrida's   view  of  int ent ionalit y  is   s imilarly  afflict ed  b y  t he  ab s ence  of  s up p ort ing  reas ons   and  argument .    Willard  illus t rat es   t hat   it   is   not   s o  much   t hat  Derrida's  account  of int ent ionalit y is  wrong as  t hat  it  is  really no account   at  all of int ent ionalit y.  See Dallas  Willard, "Predication as Originary Violence:   A Phenomenological Crit iq ue of Derrida's  View of Int ent ionalit y" in Working   Th r o u g h  Der r i d a , ed. G ary B. Madis on, p p . 1 2 0 ­1 3 6 . 
2 2 . Ma r g i n s  of  Ph i l o s o p h y , p . 9 5 . 
2 2 . Of  Gr a mma t o l o g y , p . 7 5 . 
2 2 . Derrida is  his  int erview wit h Richard Kearney in Kearney's Dialogues with   Co n t emp o r a r y Con t i n en t a l  Thi n ker s , p . 1 1 7 . 
2 2 .  Pl a t o ,  Der r i d a   a n d   Wr i t i n g   (Carb ondale:  Sout hern  Illinois   Univers it y   Pres s , 1 9 8 8 ) p. xii. 
2 2 . Fr o m Po s t mo d er n i s m t o  Mo d er n i s m: An  An t h o l o g y (O x ford: Blackwell,  1 9 9 5 ) p. 21 .
20  

0 komentar:

Poskan Komentar

Selasa, 10 Mei 2011

Postmodernis m, De rrida and Différ ance : A C ritique


An  influent ial  new  movement   has   emerged  in  p hilos op hy  in  t he  p as t   t hirt y   years  which has  come t o b e known as  Pos t modernis m.  Some b elieve t hat  t he  t erm "Pos t modernis m" is  amb iguous  and hard t o define, and it  is  t rue t hat  it  is   oft en us ed in a numb er of ways  which b ear lit t le relat ion t o t he p os t modernis t   movement   in  p hilos op hy.    For  t he  p os t modernis t   ap p roach  t o  knowledge  is   als o  dominant   in  a  variet y  of  dis cip lines ,  es p ecially  lit erat ure,  his t ory,  t heology, feminis m, and mult icult uralis m (t hough I do not  wish to suggest that   everyt hing in thes e dis cip lines  is  defined b y p os t modernis m).  Before I b egin   my  dis cus s ion  and  crit iq ue  of  p os t modernis m,  I  wis h  t o  p res ent   my  own   unders t anding  of  t he  t erm,  a  working  definit ion  which  cap t ures   it s   p h i l o s o p h i ca l imp ort .  I define p os t modernis m as  a movement  whos e cent ral   t heme is  t he crit iq ue of ob ject ive rat ionalit y and ident it y, and a working out of  t he imp licat ions  of t his  crit iq ue for cent ral q ues t ions  in p hilos op hy, lit erat ure  and  cult ure.    My  definit ion  is   mot ivat ed  b y  my  b elief  t hat   p os t modernis m is   mainly a p hilos op hical t heory ab out  t he nat ure of knowledge, and the ability of  t he  human  mind  t o  know  realit y.    In  s hort ,  p os t modernis m  mainly  revolves   around  a  s et   of   met a p h ys i ca l   cl a i ms   ab out   t he  nat ures   of  language  and   meaning.    J ean­François   Lyot ard   des crib es   t he  p os t modern  condit ion  as   charact erized b y an "incredulit y t oward met anarrat ives ," and t his  is  as good a  definit ion  as   we  get  from wit hin the ranks  of post modernis m, as  long as it  is   unders t ood  t o  mean  an  incredulit y  t oward   a l l   met anarrat ives .  (O f  cours e  Lyot ard will officially deny t hat  p os t modernis m is  a met ap hys ical t hes is .)  In   t his   art icle,  I  will  at t emp t   t o  develop   a  s et   of  crit ical  reflect ions   on  t he   p h i l o s o p h i ca l  b a s i s of p os t modernis m, and p os t modernis t  t hinking generally. 
I  b elieve  t hat   a  careful  ex aminat ion  of  t he  p hilos op hical  b as is   of  p os t modernis m  is   t he  mos t   imp ort ant   q ues t ion  a  s erious   t hinker  can  rais e  ab out  p os t modernis m;  if t his  q ues t ion is  ignored, or t reat ed s up erficially, then   t he  ap p licat ion  of  p os t modernis t   ideas   t o  p hilos op hical  is s ues   and  t ex t s ,  t o   q ues t ions   and  is s ues   in  ot her  dis cip lines ,  and  t o  s ocial,  p olit ical  and   educat ional  agendas   will  b e  great ly  undermined.    (All  college cours es  which   are dealing wit h p os t modernis m s hould dis cus s  t his  q ues t ion.)  My article will   b e  an  at t emp t   t o  develop   a  s et   of  crit ical  reflect ions   on  t he  p hilos op hical   foundat ions   of  p os t modernis m  focus ing,  in  p art icular,  on  t he  work  of  t he  French p hilos op her, J acq ues  Derrida.  Derrida's  p hilos op hy is  oft en described   as   "decons t ruct ion,"  and  I cons ider  his   p hilos op hy an ideal rep res ent at ive of


p os t modernis t   p hilos op hy  in  general.    I  will,  t herefore,  us e  t he  t erms   "decons t ruct ion" and "p os t modernis m" s ynonymous ly for t he p urposes of this   art icle. 
I will illus t rat e t hat  Derrida's  claim t hat texts­­especially philosophical   t ex t s ­­need t o b e decons t ruct ed, according t o t he met hod he p roposes, is easily   s hown  t o  b e  fraught   wit h  s erious   difficult ies .    T hes e  difficult ies   will  b e  illus t rat ed  p art ly  b y  means   of  an  analys is   of  Derrida's   decons t ruct ionis t   reading  of  Plat o.    I  will  t hen  p res ent   and  develop   five  crit icis ms   of  p os t modernis m: firs t , t hat  it  confus es  aes t het ics with metaphysics; second, that   it   mis t akes   a s s er t i o n   for   a r g u men t   in  p hilos op hy;   t hird,  t hat   it   is   guilt y  of   r el a t i vi s m;   fourt h,  t hat   it   is   s el f ­co n t r a d i ct o r y ;   and,  fift h,  t hat   it   is   guilt y  of  int ellect ual arrogance b ecaus e it s  p rop onent s  s eem t o ins is t  t hat  it s  crit iq ue of  t radit ional  p hilos op hy  can  s t ill  s ucceed  even  t hough  it s  positive claims  have  not  been es t ab lis hed. 
I.  T HE POSIT IVE CLAIMS OF POSTMO DE R NISM 
2  T he main t hes is  of Derrida's  p os it ion, as  I unders t and it , can be stated   in t he following way.  Wes t ern p hilos op hers  have b een mis t aken in their belief  t hat   b eing  is   p r es en ce ,  and  t he  key  t o  unders t anding  p res ence  is   s omet hing   along  t he  lines   of  s ub s t ance,  s amenes s ,  ident it y,  es s ence,  clear  and  dis t inct   ideas , et c.  For, according t o Derrida, a l l  i d en t i t i es , p r es en ces , p r ed i ca t i o n s ,  et c., d ep en d  f o r  t h ei r  exi s t en ce o n  s o met h i n g  o u t s i d e t h ems el ves , something   wh i ch  i s  a b s en t  a n d  d i f f er en t  f r o m t h ems el ves .  O r again: all identities involve  t heir d i f f er en ces and r el a t i o n s ;  t hes e differences  and relat ions  are as p ect s  or  feat ures  out s ide of the ob ject ­­different  from it , yet  relat ed t o it ­­yet  t hey a r e  n ever   f u l l y  p r es en t .    O r  again:  realit y  it s elf  is   a  kind  of  "free  p lay"  of   d i f f ér a n ce   (a  new  t erm  coined  b y  Derrida);   no  ident it ies   really  ex is t   (in  t he  t radit ional s ens e) at  t his  level;  ident it ies  are s imp ly cons t ructs of the mind, and   es s ent ially of language. 
3  In order t o elab orat e t hes e p oint s  furt her, it  is  help ful t o distinguish in   Derrida's  work b et ween t wo realms , t he realm of realit y (or of différance), and   t he realm of ident it ies  (or of p redicat ion and p res ence).  Derrida b elieves  t hat   t here are no ident it ies , no s elf­cont ained p res ences , no fix ed, s et t led meanings   at  the level of d i f f ér a n ce .  Furt her, t he realm of d i f f ér a n ce is n o n ­co g n i t i ve ;   i.e., it  cannot  b e fully cap t ured or des crib ed b y means  of any set of concepts, or  logical s ys t em which makes  ob ject s  "p res ent " t o t he mind.  Derrida makes this   p oint   well  in   Ma r g i n s   o f   Ph i l o s o p h y :  "It   is   t he  dominat ion  of  b eings   t hat   d i f f ér a n ce everywhere comes  t o s olicit  . . . t o s hake . . . it  is  t he det erminat ion   of  b eing  as   p res ence  t hat   is   int errogat ed  b y  t he  t hought   of   d i f f ér a n ce .  Di f f ér a n ce   is   not .    It   is   not   a  p res ent   b eing.    It   governs   not hing,  reigns   over  not hing,  and  nowhere  ex ercis es   any  aut horit y  .  .  .  T here  is   no  es s ence  of   d i f f ér a n ce ." 
Yet ,  according  t o  Derrida,  alt hough  t he  realm  of   d i f f ér a n ce   is   non­


4  cognit ive, it  never occurs wi t h o u t cognit ive knowledge (the realm of presence).  T his  is  b ecaus e our cont act  wit h it  in human ex p erience, our involvement with   it  t hrough language, always  t akes  p lace b y means  of concep t s , or p redication. 
And t his  is  s imp ly t o s ay t hat  all knowledge is co n t ext u a l in t he s ense that the  relat ions   of  an  ob ject   in  any  s ys t em  of  ob ject s   or  meanings   are  always   changing  (differing),  and  hence  meaning  (i.e.,  ident it y)  is   cont inually  b eing   p os t p oned (i.e., deferred).  T he realm of d i f f ér a n ce is  ap p rop riat ely conveyed   or  ex p res s ed  in  p hilos op hical  works   b y  means   of  met ap hor  b ecaus e  it   is   t he  nat ure  of  met ap hor  t o  s ignify  wit hout   s ignifying,  and  t his   illus t rat es   nicely   Derrida's  point  that an ident it y is  what  it  is  not  and is  not  what  it  is .  Derrida  s killfully  emp loys   many  different   and  oft en  s t riking  met ap hors   t o  make  t his   s ame point  rep eat edly: margins , t race, flow, archi­writ ing, t ain of t he mirror,  alt erit y, s up p lement , et c.  We mus t  now cons ider what  all of t his  means for the  t as k  of  evaluat ing  p art icular  worldviews ,  and  for  t he  p ract ice  of  t ex t ual   analys is . 
T o  relat e  all  of  t his   t o  t he  is s ue  of  worldviews   (es p ecially  t he  worldview  of  t radit ional  p hilos op hy),  and  t o  ex p res s   t hes e  p oint s   in  more  down  t o  eart h  language,  what   t he  p os t modernis t s   are  s aying  is   t hat   no   p art icular worldview can claim t o have t he t rut h.  All worldviews can be called   int o  q ues t ion  (including  t he  worldview  of  decons t ruct ion  it s elf,  a  p oint   t o   which  I  will  ret urn  lat er).    T he  reas on  all  worldviews   can  b e  called  int o   q ues t ion is b ecaus e t he meanings  which are cons t it ut ive of a worldview cannot   b e  known  t o  b e  t rue  ob ject ively.    T his   is   b ecaus e  t here  is   no  ob ject ive  knowledge.    All  knowledge  is   co n t ext u a l   and  is   influenced  b y  cult ure,  t radit ion,  language,  p rejudices ,  b ackground  b eliefs ,  et c.,  and  is   t herefore,  in   s ome  very  imp ort ant   s ens e,  r el a t i ve   t o  t hes e  p henomena.    T he  influence  of  t hes e p henomena on t rut h or meaning is  not  t rivial or b enign;  it  is  s uch t hat  it   inevit ab ly  undermines   all  claims   t o  ob ject ivit y  t hat   one  might   b e  t emp t ed  t o   make from t he p oint  of view of one's  worldview.  So t he job  of decons t ruct ion   is   t o  challenge  and  call  int o  q ues t ion  all  claims   t o  ob ject ive  knowledge  b y   illus t rat ing  alt ernat ive  meanings   and  "t rut hs "  in  any  p art icular  worldview,  which are really t here whet her t he adherent s  of t he worldview recognize t hem  or  not .    And  t hes e  alt ernat ive  meanings   will  undermine  t he  worldview  in   q ues t ion,  b ecaus e  t hey  will  b e  different   from,  and  oft en  op p os ed  t o,  t he  original, "ob ject ive" meanings  claimed for that worldview. 
Decons t ruct ion, t herefore, q uickly lends  it s elf t o a p olit ical agenda in   t he  s ens e  t hat   worldviews   are  almos t   b y  definit ion  op p res s ive  s ince  t hey   p rivilege s ome (lit eral) meanings  and marginalize ot hers ;  decons t ruct ion t hus   b ecomes  the met hod for reject ing and deb unking worldviews .  Convers ely, it   als o  allows   t hos e  views   and  readings   and  alt ernat ive  meanings   which  have  us ually b elonged t o minorit y group s , and which have oft en b een marginalized,  t o reclaim t heir right ful p lace in t he market p lace of ideas .  Not e, however, that   t hey  do  not   reclaim  t heir  p lace  b ecaus e  t hey  are  t rue  (for  t hat   would  b e  t o   acknowledge  ob ject ive  knowledge),  b ut   b ecaus e,  s ince  t here  is   no  ob ject ive
3  


knowledge, t hey have jus t  as  much claim t o legit imacy as  any ot her view.  O f  cours e, t hey t oo will have t o b e decons t ruct ed in t he end.  (This is a point many   s up p ort ers   of  t he  decons t ruct ionis t   ap p roach  convenient ly  overlook;   t hey   freq uent ly t alk as  if t he marginal views  are s omehow t r u e , and the mainstream  views  somehow f a l s e .) 
5  In t he language of t ex t ual analys is , Derrida is  p rop os ing that there are  no f i xed  mea n i n g s p res ent  in t he t ex t , des p it e any ap p earance t o t he cont rary.  Rat her,  t he  ap p arent   ident it ies   (i.e.,  lit eral  meanings )  p res ent   in  a  t ex t   als o   dep end for t heir ex is t ence on s omet hing out s ide t hems elves , s omet hing which   is  abs ent  and different  from t hems elves  (i.e., t hey dep end on t he op erat ion of   d i f f ér a n ce ).  As  a res ult , t he meanings  in a t ex t  cons t ant ly shift both in relation   t o t he s ub ject  who works  wit h t he t ex t , and in relat ion t o t he cultural and social   world in which t he t ex t  is  immers ed.  In t his  way, t he lit eral readings  of t ex t s ,  along  wit h  t he  int ent ions   of  t he  aut hor,  are  called  int o  q ues t ion  b y  Derrida's   view  of  ident it y.    His   p os it ion  p rivileges   writ ing   as   op p os ed  t o  s p eech  and   t hought , for writ ing has  a cert ain indep endence from aut hor and reader which   gives  a p riorit y t o amb iguit y, non­lit eralit y, and which frus t rates the intentions   of  t he  aut hor.    As   t he  French  writ er,  Roland  Bart hes ,  s ugges t s ,  our  concern   mus t  be to look at h o w t ex t s  mean, not  at wh a t t hey mean. 6  Derrida's  t hes is ,  however, is  not  res t rict ed to b ooks  or art works , for tex t s  may cons is t  of any   s et   of  ever­changing  meanings .    Hence,  t he  world,  and  almos t   any  ob ject   or  comb inat ion  of  ob ject s   in  it ,  may  b e  regarded  as   a  "t ex t ."    Pos t modernis t   p hilos op hy  is   t herefore  very  radical  indeed.    Walt   Anders on  p ut s   t his   very   ap t ly when he s ays  t hat  "Decons t ruct ion goes  well b eyond [s aying] right ­you­  are­if­you­t hink­you­are;  it s  mes s age is  clos er t o wrong you are what ever you   t hink, unles s  you t hink you may b e wrong, in which cas e you may be right­­but   you don't  really mean what  you think you do anyway." 
7  Now b efore we p roceed t o elab orat e furt her jus t  what  Derrida's  view   of  ident it y  ent ails ,  it   is   wort h  not ing  t hat   p os t modernis t   t hinkers ­­in  whos e  numb er  I  would  include  Roland  Bart hes   and  Michel  Foucault ,  in  addit ion to   Lyot ard and Derrida­­have somet imes  tried to avoid the change that t hey are  offering  a  p hilos op hical t h eo r y ab out  language and realit y, and have tried to   ins is t  t hat  t hey are s imp ly p rop os ing a new met h o d for reading t ex t s .  In short,  t hey would deny t hat  t hey are making s ub s t ant ive or met ap hys ical claims .  In   fact , s ome p hilos op hers  b elieve t hat  Derrida s hould not  b e read as making any   s ub s t ant ive claims  at all.  This  is  a view advocat ed by Richard Rort y. 
8  Rort y ident ifies  t wo different  ways  in which Derrida has  b een read by   his   American  admirers .    O n  one  s ide  are  t hos e  who  read  him  as   a  "t rans cendent al"  p hilos op her,  i.e.,  as   a  p hilos op her  who  gives   us   "rigorous   argument s   for  s urp ris ing  p hilos op hical  conclus ions ." A  t rans cendent al   p hilos op her,  t herefore,  is   a  p hilos op her  who  is   making  s ub s t ant ive  claims   which are eit her t rue or fals e, and for which he offers  argument s  (and which, if  t rue, could p os s ib ly mot ivat e s ocial and p olit ical agendas ).  T his  is  ob vious ly   t he way in which I am reading Derrida.  O n t he ot her s ide, according t o Rort y,


9  are  t hos e  who  s ee  him  as   "having  invent ed  a  new,  s p lendidly  ironic  way  of  writ ing  ab out   t he  p hilos op hical  t radit ion"  which  "emp has izes   t he  p layful,  dis t ancing,  ob liq ue  way  in  which  Derrida  handles   t radit ional  p hilos op hical   figures   and  t op ics ," and  which  is   not   concerned  wit h  t he  s ub s t ance  of  his   views .    T hat   is   t o  s ay,  Derrida  can  eit her  b e  read   in  t he  firs t   way  as   a  p hilos op her who is  making s ub s t ant ive claims  ab out language and reality, or in   t he  s econd  way  as   a  kind  of  dilet t ant e  who  ex p eriment s   wit h  t ex t s .    Rort y   p refers   t o  read  Derrida  in  t he  s econd  way.    As   a  p hilos op her, however, I see  lit t le value in reading Derrida in t he s econd way.  Surely t he mos t  res p ons ib le  op t ion  is   t o  read  him  in  t he  firs t   way,  es p ecially  s ince  t his   is   how  he is  mos t   oft en read?  Indeed, t his  is  the way in which he mu s t b e read if his  work is  t o   p rovide p hilos op hical s up p ort  for s ocial and p olit ical conclus ions .  In s hort , I  b elieve  t hat   Derrida  has   t o  b e taken at his  word and read as a tra ns cendent al   p hilos op her.  But  it  is  imp ort ant  t o not e t hat  if a t hinker in any dis cip line op t s   t o  read  Derrida  in  t he  s econd  way,  t hen  he  or  s he  cannot   us e  his   ideas   t o   advocat e educat ional, p olit ical or s ocial agendas ;  if however, one does wish to   emp loy his  ideas  in s up p ort  of various  agendas , t hen one is  ob liged t o p rovide  a  p hilos op hical  jus t ificat ion  for  t hes e  ideas .    For  ex amp le,  if  an  Englis h   p rofes s or wis hes  t o decons t ruct  t he t ex t s  of J ane Aus t en and read into them an   analys is   of  t he  op p res s ion  of  women  in  t he  ninet eent h  cent ury,  t hen  t hat   p rofes s or would have t o b eg i n t his  t as k wit h a p h i l o s o p h i ca l  j u s t i f i ca t i o n of  decons t ruct ion.    Let   me  move on to elab orat e and illus t rat e the point s  I have  b een making by turning to Derrida's  reading of Plat o. 
II.  DE R R IDA'S RE ADING OF PLAT O 
10  Now reading Derrida as  a t rans cendent al p hilosopher, he holds that all   of t he leading figures  of Wes t ern "logocent ricis m" have b een s educed by the  not ion  of  b eing  as   p res ence.    However,  t hes e  p hilos op hers   fail  t o  ap p reciat e  t he realit y of d i f f ér a n ce which is  really t here, and wh i ch  i s  o p er a t i ve i n  t h ei r   wo r k  wh et h er   t h ey  a ckn o wl ed g e  i t   o r   n o t .    What   we  mus t   now  do,  Derrida  b elieves ,  is   at t emp t   t o  s how  how  t heir  t ex t s ,  which  at t emp t   t o  ex p lain  t he  nat ure of realit y in t erms  of b eing as  p res ence, act ually cont inually presuppose  ab s ence,  d i f f ér a n ce ,  relat ions ,  et c.,  at   every  t urn.    T hat   is ,  we  mus t   "decons t ruct " their tex t s . 
I  want   now  t o  illus t rat e how this  is  supp os ed to work in a p art icular  cas e;   I  wis h  t o  cons ider  what   a  decons t ruct ionis t   reading  of  a  t ex t   act ually   looks   like.    Here  I  will  t urn  t o  an  ex aminat ion  of  one  of  Derrida's   own   readings :  t he  es s ay  on  Plat o  in  his   b ook   Di s s emi n a t i o n   called  "Plat o's   Pharmacy."    Now  Plat o  is   p erhap s   t he  "logocent ric"  p hilos op her   p a r   excel l en ce of the Wes t ern tradit ion;  he carries  a s p ecial guilt  becaus e he had   s uch  a  p rofound  influence  on  t he  his t ory  of  p hilos op hy.    Plat o,  of  cours e,  it   goes   almos t   wit hout   s aying,  was   at t emp t ing  t o  p res ent   in  his   work  a  s et   of  met ap hys ical views  ab out  t he nat ure of realit y.  His  main t hemes  are very well


known, and I will not  b ot her t o rep eat  t hem here.  But  Plat o is firmly within the  met ap hys ics   of  p res ence,  and  argues   at   lengt h  for  a  whole  met ap hys ics   of  ex t ra­linguis t ic  t rut hs   of  t he  t yp e  t hat ,  officially,  Derrida  wis hes   t o   decons t ruct . 
In  his   es s ay,  Derrida  focus es   in  p art icular  on  Plat o's   dialogue,  Ph a ed r u s ,  b ecaus e  at   t he  end  of  t he   Ph a ed r u s   Plat o  ex p licit ly  crit icizes   writ ing, and argues  that it  is  inferior t o p ure t hought  and dis cus s ion, and t hat   reading  and  rhet oric  are  inferior  t o  reas oning  and  dialect ic.    T he   Ph a ed r u s   ap p ears  to b e a q uit e app rop riat e t ex t  for Derrida t o choos e, b ecaus e, as  well   as  dealing wit h s ome of Plat o's  main ideas , it  als o cont ains an explicit criticism  of  writ ing,  and  argues   for  it s   inferiorit y  t o  s p eech  and  t hought .    So  t his   t ex t   might   b e  q uit e  fert ile  ground  for  Derrida.    Yet ,  as   one  ex amines   carefully   Derrida's  clos e reading of, and comment ary on, Plat o's  t ex t , his  ap p roach has   t hree feat ures  which it  is  imp ort ant  t o ident ify.  Firs t , a s ignificant  numb er of  s t at ement s  in Derrida's  1 0 0 + p age es s ay s imp ly make t he p oint that Plato does   p rivilege lit eral readings  (which Derrida ident ifies with speech) over non­literal   readings   (which  Derrida  ident ifies   wit h  writ ing).    In  doing  t his ,  Derrida's   reading  is   q uit e  mis leading,  in  t hat   he  makes   s o  ob vious   a  p oint   in  s uch  a  lab orious   and  ceremonial  way.  T hus ,  much  of  t he  es s ay  is   given  over  t o   es t ab lis hing  what   no­one  wis hes   t o  deny,  i.e.,  t hat   Plat o  is   wit hin  t he  met ap hys ics  of pres ence. 
Second, Derrida cont inually makes  t he p oint that Plato (and indeed his   t rans lat ors   and  comment at ors )  ignores   t he  fact   t hat   d i f f ér a n ce   is   t he  way   t hings   really  are,  which  means   t hat   t here  are  always   amb iguit ies   in  his   t ex t s   which Plat o pas s es  over in favor of what  we will call "t he lit eral meaning" of  language and t hought .  However, t his  is  a p oint  which Derrida s imp ly a s s er t s   over and over again;  nowhere does  he p rovide any reas ons or arguments aimed   at   convincing  us   t hat   we  s hould  accep t   t his   view.    (I  will illus t rat e this  point   lat er in t he art icle.)  T hird, int erwoven t hroughout  t he rep eat ed making of t his   claim are concret e s ugges t ions  and illus t rat ions  b y Derrida of how Plat o's text   mi g h t b e read in ways  ot her t han t he lit eral one.  Now let  me b riefly t urn to the  t wo main ex amp les  Derrida emp loys  t o decons t ruct  Plat o's  t ex t , ex amp les  he  us es  to illus t rat e the op erat ion of d i f f ér a n ce in Plat o's  tex t .  Thes e ex amp les   will allow me to illus t rat e furt her thes e three point s . 
O ne of t he words  Derrida s p ends  a lot  of t ime wit h is  t he G reek word   p h a r ma ko n which can mean eit her "cure" or "p ois on."  Derrida p oints out that   s ince  t his   word  is   init ially  amb iguous ,  it   b ecomes   neces s ary  t o  s p ecify  a  p art icular meaning, or ident it y, for it  b as ed on t he cont ex t  in which we find it .  For ex amp le, in t he Ph a ed r u s t he s t ory is  t old of how t he god T heut h t ried t o   s ell  his   wares   t o  King  T hamus   of  Egyp t .    Now  one  of  T heut h's   wares   is   writ ing, which he p romot es  as  a cure agains t  memory los s , and as  a significant   aid  in  t he  q ues t   for  knowledge.    T he  king,  however,  is   not   imp res s ed,  and   crit icizes  writ ing.  He is  ex p res s ing Plat o's  view when he s ays  t hat  writing will   have  a  det riment al  effect   on  memory,  and  will  cut   s t udent s   off  from  t heir


11  t eachers , and s o from t rut h.  Derrida's  p oint  ap p ears  t o be that both Theuth and   t he  King  s ee  writ ing  as   a   p h a r ma ko n ,  b ut   T heut h  means   b y  t his   t hat   it   is   a  cure, whereas  t he king (and Plat o) regards  it  as  a p ois on.  Derrida as s ert s  t hat   unt il Plat o imp os es  an int erp ret at ion here, t he meaning is  amb iguous.  Derrida  want s   us   t o  agree  t hat ,  in  realit y,  if  we  might   p ut   it   like  t hat ,  amb iguit y  is   p rimary, and ident it y is  s econdary, imp os ed, op p res s ive, and is exclusionary of  ot her p os s ib ilit ies .  T he amb iguit y, according t o Derrida, always  as s ert s  it s elf  when a new reader engages  wit h the tex t ;  and, in Plat o's  cas e, it  as s ert s  it s elf  when  a  t rans lat or  is   confront ed  b y  words   like p h a r ma ko n .    So,  according to   Derrida, Plat o "decides  in favor of a logic t hat  does  not  t olerat e s uch p as s ages   b et ween op p os ing s ens es  of t he s ame word. . . ." Plat o, in s hort , could have  emb raced  t he  free  p lay  of  meanings   and  op p os it ions   p res ent   in  his  tex t  (i.e.,  d i f f ér a n ce );   ins t ead,  he  t ried  t o  s up p res s   t hes e  op p os it ions ,  alt ernat ive  int erp ret at ions ,  amb iguit ies ,  p uns ,  met ap hors ,  et c.,  in  favor  of  a  "lit eral"  meaning.  T his  was  his  mis t ake, and t his  is  why he needs  t o b e decons t ruct ed. 
Let   me  t ake  a  s econd  ex amp le  from  t his   es s ay.    Here  we  t urn  t o  t he  word p h a r ma ko s , which refers  t o a "s cap egoat " in G reek religion.  T his  is  an   ex cellent  ex amp le wit h which t o illus t rat e Derrida's  met hod of deconstruction,  and it  will als o allow us  lat er on t o ident ify a p rob lem wit h t he ap p licat ion of  t he met hod.  Alt hough t he word p h a r ma ko s does  not  act ually appear in Plato's   t ex t , Derrida b elieves  t hat  t his  not ion of t he s cap egoat  is s u g g es ted by the text   b ecaus e of it s  clos e as s ociat ion wit h t he word p h a r ma ko n , and b ecaus e t here  are  a  numb er  of  p os s ib le  meanings   linked  t o  t he  concep t   of  s cap egoat   in   Plat o's  tex t . 
12  Derrida reveals  s ome of t hes e ot her p os s ib le meanings ;  for ex amp le,  t he s cap egoat  s ugges t s  b eing ins ide t he cit y, and b eing outside too, because the  G reeks  us ed t o s acrifice t he s cap egoat  and ex p el it  from t he cit y in a p urifying   ceremony.    It   could  b e  s een  as   b ot h  a  remedy  for  t he  cit y's  well­b eing, and a  kind  of  p ois on  t oo  which  had  t o  b e  ex p elled.    T he  not ion of p h a r ma ko s , t he  s cap egoat ,  is   als o  clos ely  connect ed  wit h  Socrat es ,  as   Yoav  Rinon  has   ins ight fully  p oint ed  out . Firs t ,  Socrat es   was   b orn  on  t he  day  of  t he  s cap egoat 's  ex p uls ion;  s econd, he hims elf was  a kind of s capegoat, essential to   t he  cit y,  yet  ex ecut ed.  He was  both cit izen and out s ider;  his  pers onalit y was   als o a realizat ion of t he unit y of cont radict ions : he was  honored and des p is ed,  loved  and  hat ed,  clos e  and  at   a  dis t ance,  knowing  all  and  knowing  not hing,  alive and dead, a remedy and a p ois on. 
13  Again, Derrida's  p oint  is  t hat  all of t hes e links  are possible readings of  Plat o's  t ex t , readings  which Plat o did not  int end, b ut  which are really there; "all   t hes e s ignificat ions  ap p ear nonet heles s ," 14  as  Derrida p ut s  it .  It  is  int eres t ing   t o  not e  t hat   while  Derrida  want s   t o  conclude  from  t his   decons t ruct ion  t hat   t here  does   not   ex is t   "a  Plat onic  t ex t ,  clos ed  up on  it s elf,  comp let e  wit h  it s   ins ide and out s ide" ;  nevert heles s  he want s  t o s ugges t  t hat  all t hes e p os s ib le  readings  are s u g g es t ed  b y t h e t ext  i t s el f , and b ecaus e of this they are somehow   l eg i t i ma t e readings .  By claiming t hat  t hes e meanings  are l inked to Plato's text


in  a  way  which  can  b e  illus t rat ed  in  t he  p roces s   of  decons t ruct ion,  Derrida  wis hes  to p lace a l i mi t on how far one can go wit h a decons t ruct ion of a t ex t .  In p art icular, he want s  t o avoid s aying t hat  one can jus t  make up meanings that   have no connect ion wit h t he t ex t  at  all.  Pres umab ly, readings , int erp ret ations,  and meanings n o t  su g g es t ed  by t h e text  it s el f would be unaccep t ab le. 
III.  FIVE CR IT IC AL PR OB LE MS FAC ING DE C ON ST R UC T ION  
1 ) Deco n s t r u ct i o n  con f u s es  aes t h et i cs  wi t h  met a p h ys i cs :  T he firs t   crit ical  p oint   t o  not e  is   t hat   a  decons t ruct ionis t   reading  is   not ,  at   leas t   as   Derrida p ract ices  it , a reading where a n y t yp e of reading is  p ermissible.  Yet, it   does   involve  "s haking  t ex t s "  t o  make  t hem  s hudder  and  reveal  alt ernat ive  meanings  t o t he lit eral meaning, and it  is  eas y t o s ee how t his  ap p roach might   s anct ion a n y t yp e of reading.  For it  is  very difficult  t o s ee how one could place  a cont rol on t he met hod of decons t ruct ion t o rule out  any s ugges t ed "link" to a  t ex t .  What  is  t o p revent  a reader from p roducing any meaning t hey wis h from  a  t ex t ?    What   is   t o  p revent   a  reader,  for  ex amp le,  from  concluding  t hat   t he  word p h a r ma ko s   (t he  s cap egoat )  s ugges t s   t hat   Plat o hims elf is  a s cap egoat ,  s ay  Aris t ot le's   s cap egoat ?    T he  difficult y  lies   in  t he  fact   t hat   it   will  b e  p rob lemat ic for Derrida to dict at e t hat  a p art icular meaning is  not  legit imat e,  for how can he judge t he ex p eriences , b ackground b eliefs , and int eres t s  of t he  reader  who  p roduces   t he  reading?    I  will  ret urn  t o  t his   p oint   in  a  moment .  Second, Derrida wis hes  t o ident ify alt ernat ive readings  in "Plat o's  Pharmacy"  in order t o illus t rat e t hat  ot her readings a r e p o s s i b l e .  Yet  it  s eems  t o me t hat   one can grant t his  p oint , and s t ill hold t hat  it f a i l s t o es t ab lis h Derrida's  main   claim.  His  main claim, as  we have s een, is  t hat  t he lit eral meaning of a t ex t  is   not  the legit imat e one. 
It  s eems  t hat  b y s imp ly s h o wi n g how a t ex t co u l d b e read in different   ways  t o t he way t he aut hor int ended, one does  not  demons t rat e t hat  t he lit eral   meaning is n o t t he main meaning, nor, more generally, t hat  meaning mus t  b e   f o r ever  def er r ed , or that all t ex t s  need t o b e decons t ruct ed.  In s hort , t he fact   t hat  we can force alt ernat ive meanings  out  of t ex t s  like Plat o's Ph a ed r u s may   have   a es t h et i c   s ignificance  (and  it   may  not ),  b ut   it   does   not   s eem  t o  follow   from  t his   t hat   it   als o  has   met a p h ys i ca l   s ignificance.    Derrida  is   s imp ly   confus ing  a  p os s ib le  (and  undoub t edly  cont rovers ial)  ap p roach  t o  t he  aes t het ics  of a t ex t  (or s et  of meanings ) wit h t he met ap hys ical imp licat ions  of  t he tex t . 
T o p ut  t his  key p oint  in a s light ly different  way:  Derrida appears to be  guilt y of making t he logically fallacious  move from t he p remis e that the reader   ca n   (aft er  much  invent ivenes s   and  p ains t aking  analys is )  read  t ex t s   in  ways   ot her t han t he lit eral one, t o t he conclus ion t hat  t his  is  how t he reader o u g ht to   read  t ex t s ,  or,  more  generally,  t o  t he  conclus ion  t hat   t here  are  no  lit eral   meanings , or t hat  t here is  no t rut h p res ent  in a t ex t .  T he firs t  p oint ma y b e of  aes t het ic s ignificance, as  I have s aid, b ut  no met a p h ys i ca l  co n cl u s i ons follow


from  it .    However,  it   is   met ap hys ical  conclus ions   which  Derrida  and  his   dis cip les  are supp os ed to b e es t ab lis hing. 
2 )   Deco n s t r u ct i o n   co n f u s es   a s s er t i o n   wi t h   a r g u men t :    T his   is   a  p art icularly egregious  mis t ake freq uent ly (and oft en arrogant ly) made b y t he  p rop onent s   of  decons t ruct ion.    Derrida  is   making,  as   we  have  s een,  a   met a p h ys i ca l claim about  the nat ure of language and meaning: t hat  t here are  no  t rans ­his t orical  meanings   or  es s ences ,  and  t hat   all  t ex t s   can  b e  decons t ruct ed.    However,  any  clos e  reading  of  any  of Derrida's  major works   reveals , I believe, t hat  he does  not  att emp t  to a r g u e fo r t his  claim;  rather, he  s imp ly a s s er t s it  over and over again. 
15  For  ex amp le,  in  t he  es s ay  on  Plat o  which  we  dis cus s ed  ab ove,  he is   s up p os ed  t o  b e  illus t rat ing  t hat   his   claims   ab out   ident it y  and d i f f ér a n ce   are  correct .    According  t o  Derrida,  Socrat es   s eeks   s elf­knowledge,  b ut   he  t hen   adds  t hat  s uch knowledge is  not  t rans p arent , t hat  it  mus t  b e "int erp ret ed, read,  decip hered." However, t his  is  an as s ert ion, not  an argument .  It does nothing   t o  convince  t he  reader  who  b elieves   s elf­knowledge  is   t rans p arent   and  t hat   Socrat es 's   meaning   is   p erfect ly  clear  and  t hat ,  alt hough  alt ernat ive  readings   might  b e p os s ib le, t hey are not  legit imat e.  O n p ages  7 0 ­7 1 , when dis cus s ing   Socrat es 's  s t ory of how t he maiden was  p laying with Pharmacia, but was swept   t o  her  deat h  b y  t he  wind,  Derrida  p oint s   out   t hat   t he  word   Ph a r ma ci a   als o   s ignifies   t he  adminis t rat ion  of  t he   p h a r ma ko n ,  t he  drug  (which  lit erally  can   mean  eit her  cure  or  p ois on).    He  t hen  claims   t hat   "t his   p h a r ma ko n ,  t his   `medicine' . . . already int roduces  it s elf int o t he b ody of t he dis cours e wit h all   it s   amb ivalence"  (p .70 ).    Derrida  t hen  goes   on  t o  rep eat edly  call the tex t  the  p h a r ma ko n .  Again,  no  argument   is   offered  for  t his .    He  might   claim  in  his   defens e  (alt hough  he  does   not )  t hat   h e   s imp ly  choos es   t o  emp has ize  t he  amb iguit y of t he word here, b ut  t he p rob lem wit h t his  move is  t hat  it  does  not   p revent me from choos ing to avoid amb iguit y in favor of lit eralit y, and, even   more imp ort ant , it  does  not hing t o convince us  t hat  we o u g h t t o p rivilege t he  amb iguous  reading. 
16  Again (on p age 8 5 ), following up  on his  p revious  as s ert ions , Derrida  s ays   t hat   Plat o  is   cons t rained  b y  t he  logic  of  ident it y­­b y  t he  s t andard   op p os it ions  of logic and realit y ("s p eech/ writ ing, life/ death, . . .  inside/outside,  . . . s erious nes s / p lay," et c.).  He t hen p roceeds  t o make a more ab s t ract  claim:   "His t ory­­has   b een  p roduced  in  it s   ent iret y  in  t he   p h i l o s o p h i ca l   difference  b et ween   myt h o s   and   l o g o s "   (p .86 ).    He  claims   on  p .96   t hat   t he  word   p h a r ma ko n   is   caught   in  a  "chain  of  s ignificat ions ,"  and  t hat   t hes e  s ignificat ions  go on working in s p it e of Plat o's  int ent ions .  As he puts it, "Plato   can n o t s ee t he links , can leave t hem in t he s hadow or b reak t hem up .  And yet   t hes e links  go on working of t hems elves .  In s p it e of him?  t hanks  t o him?  in   h i s   t ex t ?   o u t s i d e   t he  t ex t ?    b ut   t hen  where?    b et ween  his   t ex t   and  t he  language?    for  what   reader?    at   what   moment ?"  (p .96 ).    O f  cours e,  t hes e  s ignificat ions   only  go  on  working  b ecaus e  Derrida  is   f o r ci n g   alt ernat ive  meanings   out   of  t he  t ex t .    He  s ays   t hat   one  can  s up p res s  t hes e  alt ernat ive


meanings  if one wis hes , yet  t hey are s t ill p res ent  in t he t ex t .  His  p oint  is  t hat   t his  amb iguit y p recedes  Plat o's  decis ion in favor of lit erality­­"Plato decides in   favor of a logic t hat  does  not  t olerat e s uch p as s ages  b et ween op p os ing s ens es   of  t he  s ame  word  .  .  ."  (p p .98 ­9 9 ).    T rans lat ions   are  als o  guilt y  of  imp os ing   lit eralit y  on  a  t ex t ,  or  on  a  s et  of meanings .  What  act ually hap p ens , Derrida  as s ert s ,  is   t hat   t he  t ex t   d ef er s   t he  meaning,  and  s o  t he  clear  dis t inct ions   of  Plat o  are  t hus   b lurred­­`eit her/ or'  t urns   out   t o  b e  `b ot h/ and.'  He emp has izes   t hat  op p os it ions  as s ert  t hems elves  in meaning, and, aft er rep eat ing t his  p oint   a d   n a u s ea m,  he  concludes   b y  res t at ing  his   main  t hes is :  "Non­p res ence  is   p res ence. Différance, t he dis ap p earance of any originary p res ence, is a t  o n ce   t he  condit ion  of  p os s ib ilit y   a n d   t he  condit ion  of  t he  imp os s ib ilit y  of  t rut h"  (p .16 8 ). 
All  he  has   done  here,  I  am  s ugges t ing,  is   t o   a s s er t   his   main  p oint s   over  and  over  again;   he  offers   no  argument   or  reas ons   for  why  we  s hould   accep t  thes e point s  as t rue.  One will search in vain for any dis cus s ion of t he  nat ures   of  language,  int ent ionalit y,  meaning,  knowledge  or  t rut h  aimed  at   convincing  t he  reader  t hat   Derrida's   key  as s ert ions   are  t rue.    It   is   for  t his   reas on t hat  one cannot  help  b eing s us p icious  of t he ob s cure writ ing s t yle t hat   is  t yp ical of p os t modernis m, es p ecially of Derrida's  own work.  Derrida asserts   his   main  t hes es   ab out   language  and  realit y,  ab out   t ex t s   and  t heir  meanings ,  every few pages  in mos t  of his  main works , us ually b eneat h layers  of rap idly   changing, and oft en b arely p enet rab le, met ap hors , doub le and triple meanings,  mult ip le references , p uns , imaginat ive and oft en s hocking imagery.  Although   t his   writ ing  s t yle  is   very  difficult   t o  p enet rat e  (and  indeed  is   very  clever  and   creat ive),  I  s ub mit   t hat   int erwoven  t hroughout   Derrida's   many  readings   of  p hilos op hical t ex t s  lurks  mainly t his  one s ub s t ant ive claim rep eat ed over and   over again, and t hat  once one dis cerns  his  p hilos op hical s t yle, one can read his   work quit e eas ily. 
17  If Derrida cont inues  t o ins is t  t hat  he is  not  p rop os ing a met ap hys ical   t hes is  he mus t  show why not .  He simp ly cannot  make what  for all t he world   ap p ears   t o  b e  a  s et   of  met ap hys ical  claims   ab out   language,  meaning,  and   t ex t ual  analys is   and  yet   claim t hat   t hey  are n o t   met ap hys ical claims wi t h o u t   exp l a i n i n g  wh y n o t .  T his  mis t ake of confus ing as sertion with argument is also   very common in the work of Derrida's  dis cip les . 
3 ) Deco n s t r u ct i o n  i s  g u i l t y o f  r el a t i vi s m:  T his  is  p robably one of the  mos t   t renchant   crit icis ms   of  decons t ruct ion,  and  ex p lains   why   decons t ruct ionis t  t hinkers  do all in t heir p ower t o avoid t his  charge, and b ury   t heir point s  under mount ains  of ob s cure language and terminology.  But  it  is   fair  t o  s ay  t hat   decons t ruct ion  is   guilt y  of  b ot h  ep is t emological  and  moral   relat ivis m. 
It  is  int eres t ing t o p rob e t his  is s ue b y as king t he q ues t ion of whet her  or  not   a  decons t ruct ionis t   reading  of  a  t ex t   could   f a i l ,  or  b e  wrong,  on   Derrida's   view?    Would  it   b e  p os s ib le  t o  decons t ruct   a  t ex t   i n co r r ect l y ?;   t o   offer an int erp ret at ion which was  not  legit imat e?  For ex amp le, when teaching
10 


Plat o's   Eu t h yp h r o ,  s up p os e  a  p rofes s or  p rop os ed  t he  int erp ret at ion  t hat   Eut hyp hro  was   really  p laying  wit h  Socrat es ;   t hat   he  knows   t he  ans wer  t o   Socrat es 's   q ues t ions   all  along,  and  fully  unders t ands  the dis t inct ion bet ween   moralit y  and  religion,  b ut   t hinks   t hat   Socrat es 's   views   on  t hes e  mat t ers   are  s illy, s o he delib erat ely leads  Socrat es  on s o t hat  he can lat er ridicule him to his   friends .  O r s up p os e t hat  we read Hu ckl eb er r y Fi n n as  proposing the view that   J im is  a racis t .  Or t hat  Huck is  a racis t .  Or t hat  the novel is  not  ab out  racial   is s ues  at  all, b ut  is  really ab out  t he Mis s is s ip p i river, which is  a met ap hor for  life.  O r s up p os e we decide t o read Charles  Dickens ' novels  as  b eing p rimarily   ab out   child  ab us e.    T he  q ues t ion  is :  are  t hes e  readings   accep t ab le?    It   is   ob vious  that t his  is  a crucial ques t ion. 
If  a  decons t ruct ionis t   reading  of  a  t ex t   could  not   fail,  t his   s eems   t o   imp ly  t hat   a n y   reading  of  a  t ex t   i s   legit imat e,  and  if  it   could  fail,  which  (we  now know from our reading of "Plat o's  Pharmacy") is  Derrida's official answer  t o  our  q ues t ion,  t hen  yet   again  we  are  cons t rained  b y  t he  met ap hys ics   of  p res ence.    For  we  have  s een  t hat   Derrida  b elieves   t hat   alt ernat ive  readings   mus t   s t ill  have  genuine  links   t o  t he  t ex t .    So  a  "correct "  decons t ruct ionis t   reading imp lies  t hat  t here are cert ain readings  which are legitimate, and certain   readings  which are not  legit imat e.  When we work wit h a t ex t , we mus t  reveal   only  t he  legit imat e  readings .    T here is  a r i g h t and a wr o n g way to read tex t s   for Derrida after all, it  is  jus t  a lit t le b it  more elas t ic t han t he t radit ional right   way.  But  t his  p air of ident it ies  illus t rat es  again t hat  we are unab le to avoid the  met ap hys ics  of pres ence.  Now if Derrida claims  t hat  when we read t ex t s  our  only t as k is  t o reveal t he op erat ion of d i f f ér a n ce in t he t ex t ­­which means that   we cannot  p rivilege t he lit eral meaning­­he is  s t ill claiming t hat  t here is a right   way and a wrong way t o read t ex t s , and s o is  s t ill undermining his position that   a l l readings  can b e decons t ruct ed.  But  it  is  fuzzines s  ab out  jus t  t hes e kinds of  is s ues   which  has   right ly  earned  Derrida  and  his   dis cip les   t he  rep ut at ion  for  advocat ing  t he  view  t hat   meaning,  and  s t andard  logic  and  rat ionalit y,  are  arb it rary. 
Let   us   b riefly  glance  b ack  at   t he  s ugges t ions   I  made  for  alt ernat ive  readings   of  well­known  t ex t s .    Sup p os e  t hat   ins t ead  of  s aying  t hat   Hu ckl eb er r y Fi n n is  ab out  t he Mis s is s ip p i River, which is  a met aphor for life,  we  s aid  t hat   t he  novel  is   ab out   t he  Mis s is s ip p i  River,  and  t he  river  is   a  met ap hor  for  t he  op p res s ion  of  worldviews ,  es p ecially  unconvent ional   worldviews .  O ne can s ee immediat ely how t his  int erp ret at ion would appeal to   decons t ruct ionis t  t hinkers  b ecaus e it  s up p ort s  t heir p olit ical agenda.  In s hort,  t hey might  b e inclined t o accep t  t his  reading as  legit imat e.  O r t o put it another  way:  t his   is   t he  kind  of  alt ernat ive  reading  which  t hey  would  likely  come  up   wit h  t hems elves ,  or  which  t hey  would  s up p ort .    However,  t his   t hought   ex p eriment   illus t rat es   t he  nat ure  of  t he  difficult y  for  t he  decons t ruct ionis t .  T his   reading  has  no more legit imacy than any ot her reading if any reading is   p ermis s ib le;   it   cannot   b e  morally  b et t er,  or  t ex t ually  more  ap p rop riat e,  or  p hilos op hically more accep t ab le t han t he ot her alt ernat ives  I ment ioned.  T he
11 


only  reas on  a  group   might   work  wit h  t his   reading  is   t hat   it   s up p ort s   t heir  b ias es   and  p rejudices   and  int eres t s , which have been formed by their cult ure  and t radit ion and p ers onal s it uat ion, b ut  which are not  objectively true.  Hence,  decons t ruct ion  is   commit t ed  t o  moral  relat ivis m  in  t he  s ens e  t hat   no  s et   of  meanings   is   morally  p referab le  t o  any  ot her,  and  it   is   commit t ed  t o   ep is t emological  relat ivis m  b ecaus e  any  reading  of  a  t ex t  can be s hown to b e  legit imat e.  If on t he ot her hand, t o avoid t his  difficulty, postmodernist thinkers   ins is t   t hat   t h ei r   reading  or  int erp ret at ion  is   right   or  t rue  or  b et t er  t han  ot her  alt ernat ives ,  t hen  t hey  are  recognizing  a  realm  of  ob ject ive  t rut h,  which   undermines   t he  whole  p roject   of  decons t ruct ion.    Furt her,  and  jus t   as   imp ort ant , if t hey choos e t his  lat t er op t ion t hey are now ob liged t o debate with   ot hers  who agree t hat  t here is  a realm of ob ject ive t rut h, b ut  who disagree with   t he  decons t ruct ionis t s   ab out   it s   nat ure.    T hes e  difficult ies   us ually  leave  decons t ruct ionis t s  wit h an incons is t ent  relat ivis m, and it is no wonder that they   do t heir b es t  t o ob fus cat e t his  fact .  T his  p romp t s  us  t o s t at e t his  inconsistency   more ex p licit ly. 
18  4 ) Deco n s t r u ct i o n  i s  s el f ­co n t r a d i ct o r y :  Let  me t urn now to the self­  cont radict ory  nat ure  of  decons t ruct ion.    T he  t wo  realms   of  p res ence  and  of   d i f f ér a n ce   ident ified  b y  Derrida  are  p art   of  his   overall  view  ( h i s   ob ject ive,  "G od's  eye" view) of how t hings  really are.  T hey are s up p os ed t o reveal t o us   what  is  really t he cas e, or how ob ject s r ea l l y s t a n d .  T he realm of d i f f ér a n ce ,  in  p art icular,  informs   us   t hat   ob ject s   are  never  s elf­cont ained,  never  s elf­ident ical,  never  cont ain  t heir  es s ence  s imp ly  wit hin  t hems elves ,  b ut   are  always   es s ent ially  "influenced"  b y  t hos e  ot her  "ob ject s "  in  t he  s ys t em  (what ever t his  could p os s ib ly mean in p ract ice).  But  s ince this "influencing" is   cons t ant ly changing and b eing deferred, meaning, and hence any ident it ies  or  p res ences  or lit eral meanings  which emerge in and t hrough meaning, are never  t he whole s t ory.  However, if all t his  is  t he cas e, t hen, for Derrida, it  would b e   t r u e   t o  s ay  t hat   realit y  is   d i f f ér a n ce ,  and  not   p res ence.    T his   p oint   is   nicely   s up p ort ed  b y  t he  fact   t hat   Derrida's   works   are  full  of  s ub s t ant ive  (or  met ap hys ical)  claims   a b o u t   t h e  n a t u r es   o f   l a n g u a g e  a n d   mea n i n g ,  e.g.,  "Writ ing  can  never  b e  t ot ally  inhab it ed  b y  t he  voice." 19  O r:  "T he   t r a ce   is   not hing, it  is  not  an ent it y, it  ex ceeds  the ques t ion Wh a t  i s ? and cont ingent ly   makes  it p os s ib le." 20  O r: ". . . t he not ions  of p rop ert y, ap p rop riat ion and s elf­  p res ence, s o cent ral to logocent ric met ap hys ics , are es s ent ially dep endent  on   an  op p os it ional  relat ion  wit h  ot hernes s .    In  t his   s ens e,  ident it y p r es u p p o s es   alt erit y." 21  T hes e  are  t he   l i t er a l   mea n i n g s   which  Derrida  wis hes   us   t o  t ake  away from h i s t ex t s .  T his  p oint  is  furt her confirmed in t he work of Derrida's   dis cip les ,  which  is   als o  rep let e  wit h  met ap hys ical  claims ;   J as p er  Neel,  for  ex amp le,  illus t rat es   t his   very  ap t ly  indeed  when  he  s ays  "Plat o is  wrong and   Derrida is  right ." 
T he  cont radict ion is  ob vious : if we o u g h t  to read Plat o according to   t he  p rincip les   of  decons t ruct ion,  t hen  t his   is   a   met a p h ys i ca l   claim about  the  nat ure of knowledge, and Derrida is  cont radict ing his  general view that there is
12 


no one legit imat e met hod for reading and int erp ret ing t ex t s .  O r, on t he ot her  hand,  if  he  s ays   t hat   t he  decons t ruct ion  of  Plat o  is   only  a   s u g g es t i o n ,  one  p os s ib ilit y  among  ot hers ,  t hen  we  are  (met ap hys ically)  free  t o  reject   it ,  and   t here is  not hing wrong wit h p rivileging l i t er a l meanings  aft er all.  But  this too   is  a cont radict ion b ecaus e he has  b een t rying t o p ers uade us  t hat  we should not   p rivilege lit eral meanings . 
T his   is   a  s t raight forward  logical  difficult y  wit h  t he  p hilos op hy   of  decons t ruct ion.    Decons t ruct ionis t s   s omet imes   rep ly  t o  t his   p oint   b y  s aying   t hat   t heir  t heory  is   not   vulnerab le  t o  logical  crit icis ms   b ecaus e  logic  it s elf  is   p recis ely  what   is   b eing  called  int o  q ues t ion,  at   leas t   at   t he  b eginning  of  t he  enq uiry.  Since t hey are calling logic int o q ues t ion, t hey are not  ans werab le t o   logical ob ject ions .  However, t his  is  clearly a q ues t ion­b egging move.  For it is   ex act ly t h i s  p o i n t ab out  logic which Derrida and his  dis cip les  are s up p os ed to   b e es t ab lis hing.  This  conclus ion can only come (if it  comes  at  all) at  t he en d   of  t he  enq uiry.    O ne  cannot  ass ume it s  truth in the premis es  of the argument   wit hout   b egging  t he  q ues t ion.    I  b elieve  t hat   t his   logical  p rob lem  is   ins urmount ab le, and p rovides  a reas on for why s ome p hilos op hers  like Rort y   are  p rop elled  t oward  a  wholes cale  relat ivis m  of  t he  Derridean  variet y.  (Whet her t hey act ually maint ain t his  relat ivis m co n s i s t en t l y , es p ecially in t he  et hical domain, is  anot her ques t ion, of cours e.) 
Derrida  is   well  known  for  making  t he  claim  t hat   it   is   p os s ib le  t o   decons t ruct  his o wn work.  But  t his  claim mus t  b e unders t ood in the context of  t he  ab ove  crit ical  dis cus s ion.    For  t his   can  only  mean  (a)  t hat   different   concep t s ,  met ap hors ,  et c.,  could  b e  emp loyed  t o  illus t rat e  t he  realit y  of   d i f f ér a n ce , b ut  it  cannot  mean (b ) t hat d i f f ér a n ce mi g h t  n o t  b e the way things   r ea l l y a r e .  T hat  is  t o s ay, he can only mean b y claiming t hat  his own work can   b e decons t ruct ed t hat  t he s u b s t a n t i ve p oint s  he is making about deconstruction   could  b e exp r es s ed   or   i l l u s t r a t ed   in  a  different  way (which is  really a t rivial   p oint ).  But  he cannot  mean t hat  we could read his  works  and deconstruct them  in s uch a way as  t o conclude t hat  his  met ap hys ical or s ub s t ant ive claims about   how t ex t s  ought  t o b e read (and ab out language and realit y) are not t r u e .  For  if  we  could  read  Derrida  in  t his   way,  t hen  we  would  b e  free  t o  reject   t he  decons t ruct ionis t  app roach to t ex t s , and adop t  the tradit ional app roach! 
5 )   Deco n s t r u ct i o n   i s   g u i l t y  o f   i n t el l ect u a l   a r r o g a n ce  b eca u s e  i t s   p r o p o n en t s   i n s i s t   t h a t   t h ei r   ma i n   cl a i ms   ca n   s t i l l   h a ve  t h e  i mp o r t   o f   t r u t h   even   i f   t h e  cl a i ms   a r e  f a l s e :    T his   las t   crit icis m  is   very  nicely  illus t rat ed  in   s ome remarks  b y Lawrence Cahoone.  I q uot e him here b ecaus e his  ap p roach   will help  to b ring some of t he p oint s  I have b een making t oget her, and it  als o   illus t rat es   t he  t ot ally  q ues t ion­b egging  nat ure  of  p os t modernis t   p hilos op hy.  Here  is   Cahoone  comment ing  on  s ome  of  t he  crit icis ms   levelled  at   p os t modernis m:  
The  charge  of  self­ contr adiction  is  an imp or tant  one;  nevertheless, it is a purely   negative argument that does nothing to b lunt the criticisms p ostmodernism makes of
13  


tr aditional  inq uir y.    The  sometimes  ob scur e  r hetor ical  str ategies  of  p ostmodernism  make sense if one accep ts its critiq ue of such inq uir y.  To say then that the postmodern   critiq ue is invalid b ecause the kind of theor y it p r oduces does not meet the standards of   tr aditional  or   nor mal  inq uir y  is  a  r ather  weak  counterattack.    It  says  in  effect  that  whatever critiq ue does not advance the interests of tr aditional inq uir y is invalid.  The  same  charge  was  made  against  the very patr on saint of philosop hy, Socr ates, whose  infernal  q uestioning,  it  was  said,  led  to  nothing  p ositive  and  p r actical,  undermined  socially imp or tant b eliefs, and could not justify itself excep t for  his eccentr ic claim to   b e  on  a  mission  fr om  God  ( in  Plato's   Ap o lo g y) .    So,  while  the  thr eat  of  self­   contr adiction does r aise a serious p r ob lem for  p ostmodernism, one that would prevent  p ostmodernism fr om r egarding itself as valid in the way tr aditional p hilosop hies hope  to  b e,  that  fact  does  nothing  to  show  that  nor mal  inq uir y  is  immune  to  its  critiq ue.  Postmodernism  r aises  a  serious  challenge  which  cannot  b e  so  easily  dismissed.  Whether  it  is   rig h t,  is,  of  cour se,  another  matter,  and  one  that  is  up   to  the  r eader  to  22  decide. 
What  is  very revealing ab out  Cahoone's  p os it ion is  t hat  he ob vious ly b elieves   t hat  even though decons t ruct ion may be cont radict ory, it  can s t ill funct ion as   an effect ive crit iq ue of t radit ional p hilos op hy!  T his  kind of claim is obviously   fals e, and rep res ent s  yet  anot her s light  of hand from t he decons t ruct ionis t s .  It   is  t rue t hat  t he charge of s elf­cont radict ion is  mos t ly a negat ive argument , b ut   t his   is   ap p rop riat e  b ecaus e  it   s t ill  demons t rat es   t hat   decons t ruct ion  is   eit her  cont radict ory  or  relat ivis t ic,  as   I  have  ex p lained  ab ove,  and  t hes e  are  b ot h   ex cellent  reas ons  for reject ing it .  It  is  a devas t at ing counter­attack, not a rather  weak one.  O r does  Cahoone t hink t hat  if he s up p ort s  a s elf­cont radict ory or a  relat ivis t ic  p hilos op hy,  he  does   not   have  t o  defend  it ,  and  t hat   t he  b urden  of  p roof is  on his  op p onent s ? 
Cahoone  s ugges t s   t hat   b ecaus e  t radit ional  p hilos op hy  ins is t s   on   s t andards   of  logic  and  rat ionalit y,  it   cannot   offer  a  s erious   at t ack  on   p os t modernis m.    Now  why  is   t his ?    Is   it   b ecaus e  p os t modernis m  reject s   t radit ional s t andards  of logic and rat ionalit y?  I hop e I have s hown ab ove t hat   t his  claim is  t ot ally unconvincing b ecaus e it  is  as s ert ed and not argued for, and   is   s imp ly  q ues t ion­b egging.    O r  is   it   b ecaus e  t rut h  is   relat ive  (which  would   als o  include  logic  and  rat ionalit y  in  t his   cas e)?    T his   move  is   als o  q ues t ion­  b egging becaus e this  is  what  Cahoone is  supp os ed to es t ab lis h, s o he cannot   a s s u me   it   in  his   crit iq ue  of  t radit ional  p hilos op hy.    (Furt her,  of  cours e,  p os t modernis t s  us ually t ry t o deny t hat  t rut h is  relat ive.)  It  is  als o s ugges t ive  t o  not e  t he  rhet oric  emp loyed  b y  Cahoone.    Ins t ead  of  t alking  ab out   "t he  t radit ional  s t andards   of  logic  and  rat ionalit y,"  he  t alks   ab out   "advancing t he  int eres t s   of  t radit ional  inq uiry"  t hereb y  t rying  t o  carry  his   argument   b y   invoking well­es t ab lis hed cont emp orary rhet oric, which s ugges t s  op p res s ion   and  ex clus ion.    Cahoone  is   clearly  s aying  t hat   t he  p os t modernis t   crit iq ue  of  t radit ional  p hilos op hy  can   funct ion  even  if  p os t modernis m  t urns   out   t o  b e  cont radict ory.    T his   again  is   a  good  illus t rat ion  of  how  t he  p os t modernis t s   want  t o have t heir cake and eat  it : t hey want  t o avoid offering any argument  in
14 


s up p ort   of  t heir  main  claims   (b ecaus e  t hes e  claims   are  indefens ib le,  for  t he  reas ons  I have ex p lained ab ove), and yet  claim t hat  t heir p hilos op hical res ults   are st ill valid. 
In general, decons t ruct ionis t  t hinkers  avoid facing up  t o t hes e crit ical   p oint s   I  have  rais ed  ab ove,  and  oft en  t ry  t o  dodge  t hem.    It   is   virt ually   imp os s ib le to find a mains t ream work in decons t ruct ionis t  p hilos op hy which   acknowledges   t hes e  difficult ies ,  and  t ries   t o  deal  wit h  t hem,  like  any  hones t   t hinker  s hould.    Pos t modernis t s   know  very  well  t hat   t heir  work  is   op en  t o   charges  of s elf­cont radict ion, relat ivis m, lack of p hilos op hical foundation and   int ellect ual  arrogance,  and  s ince  t hes e  p os it ions   are  not orious ly  difficult   t o   defend, it  is  not  s urp ris ing t hat  t hey t ry t o deflect  t he clear light  of reason from  landing  on  t heir  ideas .    T hey  do  t his   b y  adop t ing  a  very  ob s cure  and  almos t   imp enet rab le  writ ing  s t yle,  and  it   is   no  wonder  t hat   t his   s t yle  makes   many   p hilos op hers  susp icious  that what  we are really s eeing here is  t he King's  new   clot hes  b et ween t he covers !  But  t here is  a very s erious  p oint  here, which I will   s t at e  in  t he  form  of  t wo  q ues t ions   (wit h  which  I  will  conclude):  is   it   not   int ellect ually  irres p ons ib le  t o  avoid  facing  up   t o  legit imat e  and  oft en­rais ed   crit icis ms  of one's  ideas  b y s erious  t hinkers ?  And, las t ly, s hould we­­can we­­  t ake a p hilos op hy serious ly that refus es  to do so? 
ENDNO T ES 
1 .  Th e  Po s t mo d er n   Co n d i t i o n :  A  Rep o r t   o n   Kn o wl ed g e   (Minneap olis :   Univers it y of Minnes ot a Pres s , 1 9 8 4 ) p. xx iv. 
2 . Derrida's  major works  include: S p eech  a n d  Ph en o men a  a n d  Ot h er  Es s a ys
15 


i n  Hu s s er l ' s  Th eo r y o f  S i g n s , t rans . b y D. B. Allis on (Evanston: Northwestern   U.P.,  1 9 7 3 );   Of   Gr a mma t o l o g y ,  t rans .  b y  G .  Sp ivak  (Balt imore:  J ohns   Hop kins ,  1 9 7 6 );   Wr i t i n g   a n d   Di f f er en ce ,  t rans .  b y  A.  Bas s   (Chicago:   Univers it y  of  Chicago  Pres s ,  1 9 7 8 );   Di s s emi n a t i o n ,  t rans .  b y  B.  J ohns on   (Chicago: Univers it y of Chicago Pres s , 1 9 8 1 ); Ma r g i n s  o f  Ph i l o s o p h y , trans.  b y A. Bas s  (Chicago: Univers it y of Chicago Pres s , 1 9 8 2 ); Gl a s , t rans . b y J.P.  Leavey, J r. and R. Rand (Lincoln: Univers it y of Neb ras ka Pres s , 1 9 8 6 ).  See  als o  a  s eries   of  int erviews   wit h  Derrida  in   Po s i t i o n s ,  t rans .  b y  A.  Bas s   (Chicago: Univers it y of Chicago Pres s , 1 9 8 1 ).  For a brief but helpful synopsis   of  Derrida's   major  works   b y  S.  Crit chley  and  T .  Mooney,  s ee   Twen t i et h   Cen t u r y Con t i n en t a l  Ph i l o s o p h y , ed. Richard Kearney (London: Rout ledge,  1 9 9 4 ) pp . 4 6 0 ­4 6 7 . 
3 .  Ma r g i n s   o f   Ph i l o s o p h y ,  p p .  2 1 ­2 5 .    See  als o  Derrida's   remarks   in  his   int erview wit h Richard Kearney in Kearney's   Di a l o g u es  wi t h  Co n t emp o r a r y  Co n t i n en t a l  Th i n ker s (Manches t er: Manches t er U.P., 1 9 8 4 ) p . 1 1 0 ­1 1 1 , and   p . 1 1 7 . 
4 .  See   Wr i t i n g   a n d   Di f f er en ce ,  p p .  1 1 2 ­1 1 3 .    T he  fact   t hat   t he  realm  of   d i f f ér a n ce never occurs  wit hout  cognit ive knowledge als o means  t hat  we a r e   imp ris oned in language, an imp licat ion of his  t hought  which Derrida wishes to   res is t  (s ee R. Kearney, Di a l o g u es  wi t h  Co n t emp o r a r y Co n t i n en t a l  Th inkers,  p . 1 2 3 ).   But  if all ident it ies  are co n s t r u ct s of t he mind, and we cannot operate  wit hout   ident it ies  in our dis cours e and language, t hen it  seems  to follow that  we are imp ris oned in language.  T o look at  t he is s ue from anot her angle, if, as   Derrida  b elieves ,  t here  are  no  ident it ies   b eyond  language,  for  all  p ract ical   p urp os es  t his  amount s  t o t he s ame t hing as  s aying t hat  t here is nothing beyond   language. 
5 .  As   des crib ed  b y  J ohn  St urrock  in   S t r u ct u r a l i s m  a n d   S i n ce ,  ed.  J ohn   St urrock (Ox ford: Ox ford U.P., 1 9 7 9 ) p. 58 . 
6 . Rea l i t y Is n ' t  Wh a t  i t  Us ed  t o  Be (San Francis co: Harp er and Row, 1 9 9 0) p.  8 7 . 
7 .  See  "Is   Derrida  a  T rans cendent al  Philos op her?,"  Wo r ki n g   Th r o u g h   Der r i d a ,  ed.  G ary  B.  Madis on  (Evans t on:  Nort hwes t ern  U.P.,  1 9 9 3 )  p p .  1 3 7 ­1 4 6 . 
8 . Ib i d ., p. 13 7 . 
9 . Ib i d .
16 


1 0 .  See   Of   Gr a mma t o l o g y ,  p p .  1 0 ­1 8 ,  and  p .  4 3 ,  for  a  dis cus s ion  of  "logocent ricis m." 
1 1 . Dis s eminat ion, p p . 9 8 ­9 9 . 
1 2 . See Yoav Rinon, "T he Rhet oric of J acq ues  Derrida I: Plat o's  Pharmacy,"  Revi ew  o f   Met a p h ys i cs   4 6   (1 9 9 2 )  p p .  3 6 9 ­3 8 6 ,  and  Yoav  Rinon,  "T he  Rhet oric of J acq ues  Derrida II: Ph a ed r u s ," Revi ew o f  Met a p h ys i cs 4 6  (1993)  p p .  5 3 7 ­5 5 8 .    It   is   ins t ruct ive  t o  comp are  Rinon's   reading  wit h  Chris t op her  Norris 's  in his Der r i d a (Camb ridge: Harvard U.P., 1 9 8 7 ) pp . 2 8 ­4 5 . 
1 3 . Di s s emi n a t i o n , p . 1 2 9 . 
1 4 . Ib i d ., p. 13 0 . 
1 5 . Ib i d ., p. 69 . 
1 6 . Again, t he concep t  of s up p res s ion s ugges t s  t hat  t o ignore t hes e meanings   is mo r a l l y inap p rop riat e. 
1 7 . For ot her ex amp les  of Derrida's  failure t o p rovide an argument  t o s up p ort   his  radical as s ert ions , s ee Wr i t i n g  a n d  Di f f er en ce , p p . 1 7 8 ­1 8 1 ; pp. 278­282;   Of  Gr a mma t o l o g y , p p . 6 ­1 5 ;  pp . 3 0 ­3 8 ;  p p . 4 4 ­5 0 ; Ma r g i n s  o f  Ph i l o s o p h y ,  p p .  1 ­2 7 ;   p p .  9 5 ­1 0 8 ;   p p .  2 0 9 ­2 1 9 .  (Derrida's   amb ivalence  b et ween   rep et it ion/ demons t rat ion is  int eres t ingly alluded to in Po s i t i o n s , p . 5 2 .)  T he  s ame problem is  ob vious  in much of the secondary lit erat ure on Derrida.  As   an illus t rat ion, s ee Chris t op her Norris , Der r i d a , es p ecially Chap t ers  Two and   T hree.    See  als o  J onat han  Culler's   es s ay  on  Derrida  in   S t r u ct u r a l i s m  a n d   S i n ce , ed. J ohn St urrock (O x ford: O x ford U.P., 1 9 7 9 ) p p . 1 5 4 ­1 8 0 .  Culler's   es s ay  p res ent s   a  well­organized,  clear  and  readab le  overview  of  Derrida's   major t hes es  ab out  language, realit y, meaning and t ex t ual analys is , b ut  offers   no  argument s   or  reas ons   for  why  we should accep t  thes e claims  as t rue or at  leas t   p laus ib le.    Dallas   Willard  argues   forcefully  in  a  recent   es s ay  t hat   Derrida's   view  of  int ent ionalit y  is   s imilarly  afflict ed  b y  t he  ab s ence  of  s up p ort ing  reas ons   and  argument .    Willard  illus t rat es   t hat   it   is   not   s o  much   t hat  Derrida's  account  of int ent ionalit y is  wrong as  t hat  it  is  really no account   at  all of int ent ionalit y.  See Dallas  Willard, "Predication as Originary Violence:   A Phenomenological Crit iq ue of Derrida's  View of Int ent ionalit y" in Working   Th r o u g h  Der r i d a , ed. G ary B. Madis on, p p . 1 2 0 ­1 3 6 . 
1 8 . Ma r g i n s  of  Ph i l o s o p h y , p . 9 5 . 
1 9 . Of  Gr a mma t o l o g y , p . 7 5 .
17 


2 0 . Derrida is  his  int erview wit h Richard Kearney in Kearney's Dialogues with   Co n t emp o r a r y Con t i n en t a l  Thi n ker s , p . 1 1 7 . 
2 1 .  Pl a t o ,  Der r i d a   a n d   Wr i t i n g   (Carb ondale:  Sout hern  Illinois   Univers it y   Pres s , 1 9 8 8 ) p. xii. 
2 2 . Fr o m Po s t mo d er n i s m t o  Mo d er n i s m: An  An t h o l o g y (O x ford: Blackwell,  1 9 9 5 )  p .  2 1 .  2 2 .  Th e  Po s t mo d er n   Co n d i t i o n :  A  Rep o r t   o n   Kn o wl ed g e   (Minneap olis : Univers it y of Minnes ot a Pres s , 1 9 8 4 ) p. xx iv. 
2 2 . Derrida's  major works  include: S p eech  a n d  Ph en o mena and Other Essays   i n  Hu s s er l ' s  Th eo r y o f  S i g n s , t rans . b y D. B. Allis on (Evanston: Northwestern   U.P.,  1 9 7 3 );   Of   Gr a mma t o l o g y ,  t rans .  b y  G .  Sp ivak  (Balt imore:  J ohns   Hop kins ,  1 9 7 6 );   Wr i t i n g   a n d   Di f f er en ce ,  t rans .  b y  A.  Bas s   (Chicago:   Univers it y  of  Chicago  Pres s ,  1 9 7 8 );   Di s s emi n a t i o n ,  t rans .  b y  B.  J ohns on   (Chicago: Univers it y of Chicago Pres s , 1 9 8 1 ); Ma r g i n s  o f  Ph i l o s o p h y , trans.  b y A. Bas s  (Chicago: Univers it y of Chicago Pres s , 1 9 8 2 ); Gl a s , t rans . b y J.P.  Leavey, J r. and R. Rand (Lincoln: Univers it y of Neb ras ka Pres s , 1 9 8 6 ).  See  als o  a  s eries   of  int erviews   wit h  Derrida  in   Po s i t i o n s ,  t rans .  b y  A.  Bas s   (Chicago: Univers it y of Chicago Pres s , 1 9 8 1 ).  For a brief but helpful synopsis   of  Derrida's   major  works   b y  S.  Crit chley  and  T .  Mooney,  s ee   Twen t i et h   Cen t u r y Con t i n en t a l  Ph i l o s o p h y , ed. Richard Kearney (London: Rout ledge,  1 9 9 4 ) pp . 4 6 0 ­4 6 7 . 
2 2 .  Ma r g i n s   o f   Ph i l o s o p h y ,  p p .  2 1 ­2 5 .    See  als o  Derrida's   remarks   in  his   int erview wit h Richard Kearney in Kearney's   Di a l o g u es  wi t h  Co n t emp o r a r y  Co n t i n en t a l  Th i n ker s (Manches t er: Manches t er U.P., 1 9 8 4 ) p . 1 1 0 ­1 1 1 , and   p . 1 1 7 . 
2 2 .  See   Wr i t i n g   a n d   Di f f er en ce ,  p p .  1 1 2 ­1 1 3 .    T he  fact   t hat   t he  realm  of   d i f f ér a n ce never occurs  wit hout  cognit ive knowledge als o means  t hat  we a r e   imp ris oned in language, an imp licat ion of his  t hought  which Derrida wishes to   res is t  (s ee R. Kearney, Di a l o g u es  wi t h  Co n t emp o r a r y Co n t i n en t a l  Th inkers,  p . 1 2 3 ).   But  if all ident it ies  are co n s t r u ct s of t he mind, and we cannot operate  wit hout   ident it ies  in our dis cours e and language, t hen it  seems  to follow that  we are imp ris oned in language.  T o look at  t he is s ue from anot her angle, if, as   Derrida  b elieves ,  t here  are  no  ident it ies   b eyond  language,  for  all  p ract ical   p urp os es  t his  amount s  t o t he s ame t hing as  s aying t hat  t here is nothing beyond   language. 
2 2 .  As   des crib ed  b y  J ohn  St urrock  in   S t r u ct u r a l i s m  a n d   S i n ce ,  ed.  J ohn   St urrock (Ox ford: Ox ford U.P., 1 9 7 9 ) p. 58 .
18 


2 2 . Rea l i t y Isn ' t  Wh a t  i t  Us ed  t o  Be (San Francis co: Harp er and Row, 1 9 9 0 )  p . 8 7 . 
7 .  See  "Is   Derrida  a  T rans cendent al  Philos op her?,"  Wo r ki n g   Th r o u g h   Der r i d a ,  ed.  G ary  B.  Madis on  (Evans t on:  Nort hwes t ern  U.P.,  1 9 9 3 )  p p .  1 3 7 ­1 4 6 . 
2 2 . Ib i d ., p. 13 7 . 
2 2 . Ib i d
2 2 .  See   Of   Gr a mma t o l o g y ,  p p .  1 0 ­1 8 ,  and  p .  4 3 ,  for  a  dis cus s ion  of  "logocent ricis m." 
2 2 . Dis s eminat ion, p p . 9 8 ­9 9 . 
2 2 . See Yoav Rinon, "T he Rhet oric of J acq ues  Derrida I: Plat o's  Pharmacy,"  Revi ew  o f   Met a p h ys i cs   4 6   (1 9 9 2 )  p p .  3 6 9 ­3 8 6 ,  and  Yoav  Rinon,  "T he  Rhet oric of J acq ues  Derrida II: Ph a ed r u s ," Revi ew o f  Met a p h ys i cs 4 6  (1993)  p p .  5 3 7 ­5 5 8 .    It   is   ins t ruct ive  t o  comp are  Rinon's   reading  wit h  Chris t op her  Norris 's  in his Der r i d a (Camb ridge: Harvard U.P., 1 9 8 7 ) pp . 2 8 ­4 5 . 
2 2 . Di s s emi n a t i o n , p . 1 2 9 . 
2 2 . Ib i d ., p. 13 0 . 
2 2 . Ib i d ., p. 69 . 
2 2 . Again, t he concep t  of s up p res s ion s ugges t s  t hat  t o ignore t hes e meanings   is mo r a l l y inap p rop riat e. 
2 2 . For ot her ex amp les  of Derrida's  failure t o p rovide an argument  t o s up p ort   his  radical as s ert ions , s ee Wr i t i n g  a n d  Di f f er en ce , p p . 1 7 8 ­1 8 1 ; pp. 278­282;   Of  Gr a mma t o l o g y , p p . 6 ­1 5 ;  pp . 3 0 ­3 8 ;  p p . 4 4 ­5 0 ; Ma r g i n s  o f  Ph i l o s o p h y ,  p p .  1 ­2 7 ;   p p .  9 5 ­1 0 8 ;   p p .  2 0 9 ­2 1 9 .    (Derrida's   amb ivalence  b et ween   rep et it ion/ demons t rat ion is  int eres t ingly alluded to in Po s i t i o n s , p . 5 2 .)  T he  s ame problem is  ob vious  in much of the secondary lit erat ure on Derrida.  As   an illus t rat ion, s ee Chris t op her Norris , Der r i d a , es p ecially Chap t ers  Two and   T hree.    See  als o  J onat han  Culler's   es s ay  on  Derrida  in   S t r u ct u r a l i s m  a n d   S i n ce , ed. J ohn St urrock (O x ford: O x ford U.P., 1 9 7 9 ) p p . 1 5 4 ­1 8 0 .  Culler's   es s ay  p res ent s   a  well­organized,  clear  and  readab le  overview  of  Derrida's   major t hes es  ab out  language, realit y, meaning and t ex t ual analys is , b ut  offers   no  argument s   or  reas ons   for  why  we should accep t  thes e claims  as t rue or at  leas t   p laus ib le.    Dallas   Willard  argues   forcefully  in  a  recent   es s ay  t hat
19 


Derrida's   view  of  int ent ionalit y  is   s imilarly  afflict ed  b y  t he  ab s ence  of  s up p ort ing  reas ons   and  argument .    Willard  illus t rat es   t hat   it   is   not   s o  much   t hat  Derrida's  account  of int ent ionalit y is  wrong as  t hat  it  is  really no account   at  all of int ent ionalit y.  See Dallas  Willard, "Predication as Originary Violence:   A Phenomenological Crit iq ue of Derrida's  View of Int ent ionalit y" in Working   Th r o u g h  Der r i d a , ed. G ary B. Madis on, p p . 1 2 0 ­1 3 6 . 
2 2 . Ma r g i n s  of  Ph i l o s o p h y , p . 9 5 . 
2 2 . Of  Gr a mma t o l o g y , p . 7 5 . 
2 2 . Derrida is  his  int erview wit h Richard Kearney in Kearney's Dialogues with   Co n t emp o r a r y Con t i n en t a l  Thi n ker s , p . 1 1 7 . 
2 2 .  Pl a t o ,  Der r i d a   a n d   Wr i t i n g   (Carb ondale:  Sout hern  Illinois   Univers it y   Pres s , 1 9 8 8 ) p. xii. 
2 2 . Fr o m Po s t mo d er n i s m t o  Mo d er n i s m: An  An t h o l o g y (O x ford: Blackwell,  1 9 9 5 ) p. 21 .
20  

Tidak ada komentar:

Poskan Komentar

Twitter Delicious Facebook Digg Stumbleupon Favorites More

 
Design by Free WordPress Themes | Bloggerized by Lasantha - Premium Blogger Themes | Grants for single moms